Video: Is Your Doctor Asking You to Sign Away Your Free Speech?

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theresa

Subject:

I would have to agree with Anna who stated -
"Anna
There are complicated reasons behind the need for this kind of contract between a health care provider and a client. First, the client can say anything they want in public, but the health care provider is bound by federal law not to violate their confidentiality by discussing their case in public. They are unable to speak in their own defense in public. Also, who're the kind of people who ventilate their feelings about a provider in public? Angry ones, generally. Basically, this contract is to prevent someone making gross, unanswerable accusations in public, smearing a health care provider's professional reputation. Wouldn't you want to be able to speak in your own defense to prevent someone from ruining your professional reputation? I support these contracts. If you are upset about the care you received, then take it up in a legal fashion with the licensing board or an atty. These are perfectly valid ways to express your frustrations. If your claims have merit, then the provider should be sanctioned by a professional body with the ability to provide oversight of that provider's practice. Anything less than oversight is not going to change anything, anyway, so what good does public griping do to change that person's behaviors with clients?"

Hippa laws prevent the medical industry from disclosing any information and as such this binds that particular profession from responding in any forum other than the medical board or legally in a court of law.

Christa Landon

Subject:

I would fear that such a waiver would even prevent a patient from filing a legal suit or making a complaint to a professional organization. Date and initial the blackouts!

suny

Subject:

Doesn't this fall under freedom of speech

Floris

Subject:

Peter, LOL is not a word either. A good comment is a good comment and a useless comment is a useless comment, regardless of the words.

Walt

Subject:

It comes down to this, You are the customer! If you have a bad experience at the doctors office you have every right the express that. I'm not saying that you should be reckless in your wording but just the facts. There are plenty of doctors out there, if one turns you away for not signing the form it's really his/her loss. No customers, no pay! You should do what you can to inform the community that you are in to let them know what is going on. You're the customer, you say what goes on at the doctors office.

Anna

Subject:

Barbie Girl - You missed an important part of my post: "the health care provider is bound by federal law not to violate their confidentiality by discussing their case in public." It doesn't matter whether it is said on Angie's List or Yelp, they may not respond to the content of the comment, because it is a violation of that client's confidentiality. Take up your complaints with the regulatory body of that provider's licensing. Action will ensue, rather than more blathering on the internet.

kate

Subject:

The best way to find an initial physician contact is word of mouth; a friend recommendation. No way would I give up my right to speak about health care. Right now I am taking on a massive HMO because administrative policies are jeopardizing patient lives. Speak up. Good or Bad. The physician who requires a gag order quacks.

BarbieGirl

Subject:

Would the Josh Tobin who said 'good advice...do it. it works. 3/14/2011 9:10:32 PM ' happen to be a Neurologist in Phoenix??? If so, perhaps that's why he's in favor of the idea.
In response to 'Anna-5/12/2011 10:43:04 AM': if the comments are made on Angie's List, the Provider does have the opportunity to respond to the 'gross, unanswerable accusations' made on the site. So far, the only comments I've made about medical professionals have been highly favorable. But there are a few I should think about adding with negative comments after reading this...

Connie

Subject:

I had a specialist's office refuse to treat me because I refused to sign a no-sue contract. Needless to say, I left without treatment.

Anna

Subject:

There are complicated reasons behind the need for this kind of contract between a health care provider and a client. First, the client can say anything they want in public, but the health care provider is bound by federal law not to violate their confidentiality by discussing their case in public. They are unable to speak in their own defense in public. Also, who're the kind of people who ventilate their feelings about a provider in public? Angry ones, generally. Basically, this contract is to prevent someone making gross, unanswerable accusations in public, smearing a health care provider's professional reputation. Wouldn't you want to be able to speak in your own defense to prevent someone from ruining your professional reputation? I support these contracts. If you are upset about the care you received, then take it up in a legal fashion with the licensing board or an atty. These are perfectly valid ways to express your frustrations. If your claims have merit, then the provider should be sanctioned by a professional body with the ability to provide oversight of that provider's practice. Anything less than oversight is not going to change anything, anyway, so what good does public griping do to change that person's behaviors with clients?

steve

Subject:

does anyone know if this is even legal?

Linda

Subject:

Often office staff/managers are the gatekeepers for a practice. However, more and more practitioners are refusing to see patients in this area so use caution. Getting through medical school does not ensure that a doctor has the emotional maturity to examine their office from the patient perspective.

frosty7r530

Subject:

Pretty sad that doctors feel a need to do this. Sadly, it may be allowed in some states. Sometimes a community of physicians may even bond together to enforce this. I would check w/a local medical atty.

Stephen Hooper

Subject:

There's a much more important reason why patients should have nothing to do with such so-called professionals: it's unethical for a doctor to require you to sign such a contract. These people ought to be reported to the appropriate licensing authority.

Marjie

Subject:

I have crossed out portions of these "contracts'. Either no one notices/doesn't care. Would a doctor refuse to see a patient IF they refuse to sign waiver? Seems any dr. requiring this would be afraid they wouldn't get ANY positive comments.

myra Richardson

Subject:

This happened to me. I don't want them to use me or my daughter at our expense

Dave R

Subject:

No, this is not the same as a doctor not being allowed to broadcast your personal health information. If they are worried about a patient wrongfully bad mouthing them, they are allowed to sue if they want, they are protected under slander/libel laws. When they require you to sign away your right to talk about your experience in their office, that to me is a sign they are not very good at what they are doing. Maybe as patients we should require them to sign a form stating they will not fight a malpractice suit should one arise from their treatment. People need to be able to voice their opinions on bad medical care, otherwise we risk having many patients mistreated and then feel they have no recourse, and then more get mistreated because the others could not talk about it to raise awareness of potential problems. There are many treatments and even more medications that state things like 'it is believed this helps because it may do this' If we are to be guinea pigs we need to look out for each other.

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I don't know why they wouldn't. If you're looking for a new doctor, you can find tons of information on individual doctors and practice groups on Angie's List.
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Hey mwhanna,

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