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Recent Air Duct Cleaning Reviews in Harrisville

  • A
    Grogg's Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
    Ozone Depletion Destruction of ozone by chlorinePresence of chlorine in CFC and HCFC refrigerantsIdentification of CFC, HCFC, and HFC refrigerants (not chemical formulas, but idea that R-12 is a CFC, R-22 is an HCFC, R-134 is an HFC, etc.)Idea that CFCs have higher ozone-depletion potential (ODP) than HCFCs, which in turn have higher ODP than HFCsHealth and environmental effects of ozone depletionEvidence of ozone depletion and role of CFCs and HCFCs Clean Air Act and Montreal Protocol CFC phaseout dateVenting prohibition at servicingVenting prohibition at disposalVenting prohibition on substitute refrigerants in November, 1995Maximum penalty under CAAMontreal Protocol (international agreement to phase out production of ozone-depleting substances) Section 608 Regulations Definition/identification of high and low-pressure refrigerantsDefinition of system-dependent vs. self-contained recovery/recycling equipmentIdentification of equipment covered by the rule (all air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment containing CFCs or HCFCs except motor vehicle air conditioners)Need for third-party certification of recycling and recovery equipment manufactured after November 15, 1993Standard for reclaimed refrigerant (ARI 700) Substitute Refrigerants and oils Absence of "drop-in" replacementsIncompatibility of substitute refrigerants with many lubricants used with CFC and HCFC refrigerants and incompatibility of CFC and HCFC refrigerants with many new lubricants (includes identification of lubricants for given refrigerants, such as esters with 134; alkylbenzenes for HCFCs)Fractionation problem--tendency of different components of blends to leak at different rates Refrigeration Refrigerant states (vapor vs. liquid) and pressures at different points of refrigeration cycle; how/when cooling occursRefrigeration gauges (color codes, ranges of different types, proper use) Three R's Definitions RecoverRecycleReclaim Recovery Techniques Need to avoid mixing refrigerantsFactors affecting speed of recovery (ambient temperature, size of recycling or recovery equipment, hose length and diameter, etc.) Dehydration Evacuation Need to evacuate system to eliminate air and moisture at the end of service Safety Risks of exposure to refrigerant (e.g., oxygen deprivation, cardiac effects, frost bite, long-term hazards)Personal protective equipment (gloves, goggles, self-contained breathing apparatus--SCBA--in extreme cases, etc)Reusable (or "recovery") cylinders vs. disposable cylinders (ensure former DOT approved, know former's yellow and gray color code, never refill latter)Risks of filling cylinders more than 80 percent fullUse of nitrogen rather than oxygen or compressed air for leak detectionUse of pressure regulator and relief valve with nitrogen Shipping Labels required for refrigerant cylinders (refrigerant identification, DOT classification tag) Top of page TYPE 1 (Small Appliances) Recovery Requirements Definition of "small appliance"Evacuation requirements for small appliances with and without working compressors using recovery equipment manufactured before November 15, 1993Evacuation requirements for small appliances with and without working compressors using recovery equipment manufactured after November 15, 1993 Recovery Techniques Use of pressure and temperature to identify refrigerants and detect noncondensablesMethods to recover refrigerant from small appliances with inoperative compressors using a system-dependent or "passive") recovery device (e.g., heat and sharply strike the compressor, use a vacuum pump with non-pressurized recovery container)Need to install both high and low side access valves when recovering refrigerant from small appliances with inoperative compressorsNeed to operate operative compressors when recovering refrigerant with a system-dependent ("passive") recovery deviceShould remove solderless access fittings at conclusion of service134a as likely substitute for 12 Safety Decomposition products of refrigerants at high temperatures (HCl, HFl etc) Top of page TYPE 2 (High-Pressure) Leak Detection Signs of leakage in high-pressure systems (excessive superheat, traces of oil for hermetics)Need to leak test before charging or recharging equipmentOrder of preference for leak test gases (nitrogen alone best, but nitrogen with trace quantity of 22 better than pure refrigerant) Leak repair requirements Allowable annual leak rate for commercial and industrial process refrigerationAllowable annual leak rate for other appliances containing more than 50 lbs of refrigerant Recovery Techniques Recovering liquid at beginning of recovery process speeds up processOther methods for speeding recovery (chilling recovery vessel, heating appliance or vessel from which refrigerant is being recovered)Methods for reducing cross-contamination and emissions when recovery or recycling machine is used with a new refrigerantNeed to wait a few minutes after reaching required recovery vacuum to see if system pressure rises (indicating that there is still liquid refrigerant in the system or in the oil) Recovery Requirements Evacuation requirements for high-pressure appliances in each of the following situations: DisposalMajor vs. non-major repairsLeaky vs. non-leaky appliancesAppliance (or component) containing less vs. more than 200 lbsRecovery/recycling equipment built before vs. after November 15, 1993 Definition of "major" repairsProhibition on using system-dependent recovery equipment on systems containing more than 15 pounds of refrigerant Refrigeration How to identify refrigerant in appliancesPressure-temperature relationships of common high-pressure refrigerants (may use standard temperature-pressure chart--be aware of need to add 14.7 to translate psig to psia)Components of high-pressure appliances (receiver, evaporator, accumulator, etc.) and state of refrigerant (vapor vs. liquid) in them Safety Shouldn't energize hermetic compressors under vacuum.Equipment room requirements under ASHRAE Standard 15 (oxygen deprivation sensor with all refrigerants) Top of page TYPE 3 (Low-pressure) Leak Detection Order of preference of leak test pressurization methods for low-pressure systems (first: hot water method or built-in system heating/pressurization device such Prevac; second: nitrogen)Signs of leakage into a low-pressure system (e.g., excessive purging)Maximum leak test pressure for low-pressure centrifugal chillers Leak repair requirements Allowable annual leak rate for commercial and industrial process refrigerationAllowable annual leak rate for other appliances containing more than 50 lbs of refrigerant Recovery Techniques Recovering liquid at beginning of recovery process speeds up processNeed to recover vapor in addition to liquidNeed to heat oil to 130F before removing it to minimize refrigerant releaseNeed to circulate or remove water from chiller during refrigerant evacuation to prevent freezingHigh-pressure cut-out level of recovery devices used with low-pressure appliances Recharging Techniques Need to introduce vapor before liquid to prevent freezing of water in the tubesNeed to charge centrifugals through evaporator charging valve Recovery Requirements Evacuation requirements for low-pressure appliances in each of the following situations: DisposalMajor vs. non-major repairsLeaky vs. non-leaky appliancesAppliance (or component) containing less vs. more than 200 lbsRecovery/recycling equipment built before vs. after November 15, 1993 Definitions of "major" and "non-major" repairsAllowable methods for pressurizing a low-pressure system for a non-major repair (controlled hot water and system heating/pressurization device such as Prevac)Need to wait a few minutes after reaching required recovery vacuum to see if system pressure rises (indicating that there is still liquid refrigerant in the system or in the oil) Refrigeration Purpose of purge unit in low-pressure systemsPressure-temperature relationships of low-pressure refrigerants Safety Equipment room requirements under ASHRAE Standard 15 (oxygen deprivation sensor with all refrigerants)Under ASHRAE Standard 15, need to have equipment room refrigerant sensor for 123 thats alll
    - katie s.
  • A
    Grogg's Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
    This is the best company we have ever dealt with in the home-improvement line.  When they came to do the estimates and explain our options, they were prompt, professional and completely explained everything and answered our questions most satisfactorily.  When the installers came and did the work they were so nice and polite and clearly knew what they were doing.  The work was completed with as little "bother" to us as I could think was possible.  After the installation was complete, they explained everything, especially concentrating on the new-to-us programmable thermostat until we understood how to operate it with no trouble.  I was also highly impressed with the way they cleaned everything up so well after such a big installation.  We were left with absolutely nothing to clean up. This system has made our home so much more comfortable and worry-free.  We love it.
    - Victoria B.
  • A
    Grogg's Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
    They did a complete duct work cleaning and installed new humidifier and air cleaner. There was an initial problem in operation but they came the next day and fixed it.
    - Helen W.
  • A
    Grogg's Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
    They are very professional. We had them install a new ac unit and have fixed a heater for us in the past. They are clean, efficient and punctual. They are personable yet professional.
    - Jorie K.
  • A
    Grogg's Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
    I was so very impressed with the professionalism of the sales and installation contactsl.  I was most impressed with the quality of work.  The installation of all the furnace and duct work replaced in the area of the furnace was so neat.  Their work ethics were better than any other I have experienced.  They were offering a special for their 43rd year anniversary.  Look for their anniversary specials in October.  I would recommend them to anyone.
    - Teresa E.
  • F
    Hocking Hills Air Care
    Very Bad. I have 3 nice holes in my main and return duck work. He gets into your home with a false ad of $39.95, and then tells you "Lady you just wasted your money for only doing the work of $39.95.I ened up getting only the duck work done, for $213.98, which I should of stopped at the $39.95 and took his word that I threw my money away.If he would of cleaned everything the job would of been $759.85 so that is far off from $39.95. I was a fool and fell for his ad. I told him I was a fool to fall for his ad and he said:"That's not my fault you are". Very rude man. I would never have him to go to any ones place. Even after I paid him his $213.98 he was going out the door running his mouth and making threats. I told him to leave or I would call the law. I didn't answer anything he was saying and I think it made him mad, but sometimes it is just better to let people vent and show them the door. I am a senior citizen and I don't need any trouble in my home my husband is very ill and I thought it might make him feel better if we cleaned the vents. I don't trust people who get bent when you question there work. Mr. Ganren said why didn't we do it ourselves! We should of tried.
    - Debra P.
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Air Duct Cleaners in Harrisville

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