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Patio And Sunroom Builders to Avoid


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Over 574 reviews for
Fayetteville Patio And Sunroom Builders from people just like you.

"I could not be any more happier with and his crew. They are open with changes. The crew and sub-contractors are all fabulous. I would give" them a triple A+. I will plan to use them for my next project and I wouldn’t use anyone else.

-David N.

"I went with because they were on Good Morning America. Shame on Good Morning America for advertising such a HORRIBLE company. I made a" HUGE, GIGANTIC, mistake signing with . If I could take down the panels, I would. They have lied to me since last February when I signed. I have been put off, lied to, and mislead. has taught their salespeople to lie and tell the customer anything just to get them signed. Finally got hooked up in June and in October, I received a bill from NV Power for $750.00, while I pay $112.00 a month for 73% of Solar Power, which I was promised 95%. Go figure. I have called and they told me on 11/15/2015 it's not their problem, but it's ok that I am now paying DOUBLE in electric when they promised to save me money. They flat out lied to me. Their customer relations department doesn't care when you call. Do not ever go with . They are a HORRIBLE company. All of the salesmen I have worked with have left the company. What does that say about the company? Go with Sun Run, they are a better company and they don't lie and steal from their customers. My friend went with them, and she is very happy with them

-Cindy M.

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Local Articles in Fayetteville

Porches and Sunrooms

Porches and sunrooms can add space and character to any home. From helping to create a unique look to the many benefits that they offer to the homeowner, these structures have the ability to add visual appeal and extra living space to any home when properly constructed.

remodeled sunroom addition

For the past 11 years, Amy Koch and her family haven't been able to make the most of their all-glass, three-season sunroom.

swimming pool with concrete deck

Which remodeling projects or renovations should homeowners NOT do for best resale value? Take a look!

Pella sunroom with windows

An East Coast remodeler recommends planning your enclosed porch project in spring, summer or fall.

blue tile bathroom

Looking to add zest to your next remodeling project? Consider tile.

Angie's Answers

Todd said it best.

An itemized list / cost breakdown, more often than not is used against the contractor when it is shared with other builders who will then beat it.

Good contractors use good people, and good people cost more.  Just the cost of having the appropriate insurance / bond can be the difference between winning a job or losing it ot a 'lower bid'.

It is the rule of three; there is Good, Cheap and Fast.  You can have any two:  Good and Cheap, won't be Fast; Good and Fast, won't be Cheap;  Cheap and Fast, won't be Good!

When comparing bids, it isn't the cheapest or the 'nicest' person you should select.   You should understand why there is a large price difference (it shows there are gaps in your design program or what you have asked for specifically, which means there may be arguments later).  If most of the bids are in line, and one is way high or way low,  you want to know why before dismissing or selecting them.

A price-only decision almost always costs more in the long run. 

Good luck!

No.  Heck no.  Here's a good example.  We very recently needed to find someone to install about 500 square feet of exotic wood flooring (we already have the materials).  We contacted about 12-15 top-rated Angieslist contractors.  Out of the few who did get back to us, we got 5 quotes, 2 of them were literally just over the phone.  They "didn't feel it would be necessary to even see the space". 


Here were the bids: 

$4000 (sight unseen), $2800 (sight unseen), $2500, $1500, $1450


We didn't "share our budget for this".  Why would we?  We asked them to bid the job.  That's it.  All of them should be well-qualified and they are all highly rated.  We were interested in how THEY value their time/resources - for an apples/apples job. 


Do you still think that you should tell them about your budget?  Your choice.  From my standpoint it isn't their business.  I'm asking them to bid on a project.  Invariably I'll get some very high bids, medium bids and a few more reasonable ones - ALL from "highly rated contractors". 

For this type of job, you need plans and specs from an Architectural/Engineering firm before thinking about contractors - and to get a building permit. Ben's method would work and done incrementally could cost well over $100,000 plus as he says, but this not really the most economic way to approach this big a job. A House Mover or Foundation Underpinning specialty company can usually slide your house onto a whole new foundation, or jack it up on steel beams and hold it there while a basement is dug underneath it, without any intermediate piers. The jacking/move cost would probably be on the order of $30-40,000, and a new basement probably about $40-50,000 - rough ballpark, though I have been involved in some 1000-1500SF single story jobs that went for under $70,000 total. I have been involved in a fair number of these type jobs - and the way the numbers come out, if there is room on the property to move the house, it is almost always nearly as cheap or cheaper to build an equivalent square footage (basement plus ground level) addition rather than add a basement under the house, and that way your new footage is half above ground so worth more on resale, plus you do not lose use of the house for a month or two. Second cheapest is usually sliding house to a new foundation, if property is large enough to do this - though house is totally cut off from utilities for a week to three. Most expensive, and usually only done in tight city environments or with full 2 story or higher houses, is adding the foundation in place, though your utility interruptions should be on the order of hours at a time rather than days or weeks. Talk to an architect - I think you will quickly lean towards the addition option rather than adding a basement - it is just too expensive to deepen foundations in most cases, plus you WILL get cracking in the house and possible water and sewer pipe problems in a move/underpinning job, which is not the case with an addition. This become more likely the case since you want to add 8 feet off the back of the home anyway - so why not just enlarge the addition and do it all that way - MUCH simpler, and MUCH less disruption of your life, and you get much higher resale return on your investment.

Herlonginc's answer stated that it is not the contractor's job to pay for materials and labor to do the job. I say baloney - a reputable, established contractor has the funds (or a business operations line of credit) to "carry" the job between interim or partial payments, each of which should be keyed to completion of distinct easily measured mileposts in the job, and for a homeowner I would say should be in not more than 20% increments for jobs exceeding a week or so. For shorter jobs, then an initial payment, 50% completion, and completion would be normal. His cost of carry funds is part of his cost of doing business, and is figured as part of his overhead.Bear in mind when he is buying materials and paying labor, his materials he typically pays for on a 10-30 day invoice, and his labor typically a week or two after they work, so he is not really "fronting" that much money if you are giving him weekly or biweekly interim payments, on a typical residential job.

If he does not have the funds to buy materials (excepting possibly deposit on special-order or luxury items, which still typically are 10-30 day invoiceable to him) and hire personnel then he is a fly-by-night operation, and he should not be bidding that size job. You should never (other than MAYBE an earnest deposit of not more than the LESSER of 10% or $5000) let the payments get ahead of the approved/inspected work progress - typically payment should be 10-20% BEHIND the progress, with at least 10% retained at the effective end of work until final inspections and completion of the final "punchlist".

That promotes rapid continuation of the work, discourages the all-too common nightmare of contractors taking on more work than they can handle so they leave your job for weeks or months to go work on someone else's job (frequently to start that someone else's new job so he can get the job), and does not leave you out a tremendous amount of cash if he does not finish and you have to hire another contractor to finish the job. Remember, if you have to hire a new contractor to finish the job, he will charge you a lot more than the original bid to finish someone else's unfinished mess.

This may seem cynical, but having started in the construction business about 50 years ago and seeing the shenanigans that a lot of contractors pull you cannot be too safe. You have to remember contractors are like any other people - I would say maybe 10% are outright crooks, another 25% or so will pull a fast one or overcharge if the opportunity presents itself, maybe 30% will do the work but not any better than they are forced to, about 25% are good conscientious reputable workmen, and the last 10% or so are really spectacular - conscientious, fair, and efficient craftsmen. This top 35% are the only ones you should have bidding in the first place. Therefore, only get bids from long-term reputable firms (so you shake out the marginal short-timers with less experience and also generally less ability to finish the job on budget and schedule), only those that have good RECENT references, and preferably with excellent word-of-mouth recommendation from people you know and trust. That way, you are starting right off with the cream of the crop, so hopefully whichever one bids low should be a good choice.

NEVER start with bids, then check the references of the low bidder - why even consider a vendor or contractor who you do not have faith in from the start ? Get references and short-list you possibles BEFORE you ask for bids.

Low bids - that is another matter - commonly the low bidder is NOT who you want, especially if he is significantly lower than several others, which might mean he is desperate for work, made a math error, or did not correctly figure the entire scope of work. You want a reasonable bid with someone you connect with and trust - that is worth a lot more in the success of the job than the absolute lowest bid.


Sunroom And Patio reviews in Fayetteville


provided professional consultation about our pool enclosure and options for repair/replacement of the screen. He gave us a fair estimate for the service he recommended. When a rescheduling or cancellation provided us an opportunity to have the re-screening services ahead of our scheduled appointment, called ...More and offered us the earlier date. and his son were an efficient, polite, hard-working team. They thoroughly policed the area, cleaned-up and inspected their work with us during the final walk-through.
- John S.

not well. the contact phone number for this provider is no longer answered. the guy who was supposed to get it permitted disappeared for a month with a check for permit fees after saying it would take a few days. when the inspector showed up, we failed inspection because they were supposed to call for parts to be inspected during ...More construction and electrical was not listed on the permit. so the patio is up, but have no permit at this point.
- Michelle D.

I've used for several projects on the patio, installing dog doors, installing kick plates around the bottom of the entire enclosure and doing a rescreen from a termite tenting job. I usually have the same tech come out, he was quick and professional. He had the job done right the first time and even was careful about watching ...More out for my dogs while there. These guys are my go to for the patio enclosure.
- Jeff S.

provided an estimate for 6 windows.... salesman was great until I was not prepared to make a decision on the spot. When I told him that I wanted to think about it and discuss with my wife - he stated that he should NEVER have met with me if I needed 'my wife' to help make the decision. Of course - the 'discount' would ONLY last ...More until the end of the day.... so I asked him to call me at the end of the day.... of course - there was NO call. Truly a horrible experience. Their product seemed good.... but their price was much higher than similar competitors.
- Michael P.

The quality of the work was great! The communication from the lead on the project was awesome. He worked with us to make sure we didn't go over budget.
- Kristoffer L.

On 27 October 2014 I contracted with (BHI) to take an already existing porch and turn it into a sunroom. The porch had an existing roof, patio deck, and support posts. As outlined in the original contract, BHI was contracted to complete the following tasks:

1. Windows and Doors: a. Frame walls with thermal ...More break framing. b. Install tempered LowE glass knee wall. c. Install 5500 Lifetime warranted windows. d. Install two insulated fiberglass doors with LowE tempered glass.

2. Flooring: a. Place 3/4-inch plywood over the existing Decking. b. Place a Radiant under the 3/4-inch plywood. This task was NOT COMPLETED. When it came time to install the plywood, I asked about the radiant and I was first told by BHI that a radiant and vapor were the same. Then, after I did some research and questioned what I was told, I was told by BHI that a radiant could not be installed because putting plywood with a radiant on top of the existing decking would not allow for the proper application of a radiant . This should have been identified from the onset since they boast about having 22 years experience.

3. Electrical: a. Install two interior electrical outlets. b. Install two exterior GFI outlets. c. Install two exterior security lights.

4. Wrap the already existing support posts with aluminum.

This task was NOT COMPETED. The subcontractor installing the windows for BHI was not informed by BHI of this requirement and he installed the windows without considering the wrapping of the posts. By the time this failure was noticed it would have taken removing all of the already installed windows to correct the oversight. So, instead of removing the windows BHI advised me that there were too many electrical outlets to cut around. Again, the number of outlets were known from the date I signed the contract and if this was not possible they should not have contracted to do it. They did, after the fact, offer some additional work as compensation. However, I terminated my relationship with BHI and hired another contractor to fix my leaks and he was able to wrap the outside of the posts with no issues. Either BHI mislead me from the beginning or they were unwilling to remove the windows to make it right so they manipulated the situation to avoid doing so. Based on BHI's guidance, I ended-up I purchased paneling, trim pieces, and other misc. materials to cover the inside of the posts at an additional cost of approximately $400.00 plus the cost of my time (approximately 40 hours) to mitigate something BHI was contracted to do. The follow-on contractor advised me he could have wrapped the insides of the post without any problems but by then it was too late I already had them covered with paneling.

In short, BHI did not wrap the posts as contracted because of a BHI screw-up that BHI later attempted to recover from with a fabrication. BHI did offer to do some other aluminum work as compensation but that is not the point. The situation was a total manipulation by BHI to save them the additional costs of removing the windows to correct their failure. 5. Wrap an already existing center beam with new wood.

6. Install HVAC supply and return lines. Prior to signing the contract with BHI I explained to BHI and all of the contractors I interviewed for the job that the project needed to be completed ASAP. This requirement was because, for legal reasons, the home had to be refinanced by 01 March 2015 and I was planning on moving into the home the middle of March 2015. All contractors, including BHI, estimated a realistic time for completion to be approximately 60 days with a maximum of 90 days and stated my time constraints would not be a problem. In fact when asked, I was specifically told by BHI’s Sales Representative prior to signing the contract that if there were no “problems” they could complete the project in as little as six weeks. Along with the work requirements as outlined above the contract also states the following: “The contractor agrees to use best effort to commence work approximately 10 days from the contract date and complete work approximately 90 days from the start.”

Along with their timeline guarantees, BHI also offered larger windows and a lifetime warranty. The larger windows, lifetime warranty, verbal timeline assurances, and contract language resulted in me being confident that BHI would complete the effort as discussed and within my timeline requirement.

During the month of November 2014 and most of December 2014, after paying BHI an initial installment of $5,000.00 or 32% of the total cost of the project, we waited patiently and on 17 December 2014 we finally received an email from BHI’s Engineer asking us to approve his Engineer Drawings. The next day I pointed-out to BHI the following issues with his drawings. Height of the knee wall was incorrect. Tempered glass was not required on left rear elevation window. East Door Deadlight width was not marked. Requested verification the East Door Deadlight width should be 10-inches. Overall measurements throughout the drawing were incorrect. By 19 March 2015 my sunroom was still not completed and we had to refinance as was discussed with BHI at contract signing. We could not proceed with the refinance because of the Notice of Commencement filed with the county. So, I approached BHI and asked that an addendum be added to the contract outlining the remaining work and that BHI guarantee the work will be completed within 30 days. In return I would pay them the final installment so they could close the Notice of Commencement so we could move forward with our refinance. BHI agreed but failed to complete the work within the 30 day period. Meaning with the additional 30 days BHI had six months to complete a job that should have taken 60 days. At one point when I was pressuring BHI to complete my sun room I was told by the owner "the more pressure I apply the longer it will take." I finally filed a charge dispute with my financial institution. After filing the dispute and providing the evidence to my financial institution, I was informed by my financial institution that they were positive I would the dispute. I did have follow-up discussions with BHI and the only resolution to the situation offered by BHI was for them to be allowed to continue with the project. Otherwise, I was informed by the owner that if I did not allow them to continue and the money was taken back he would file a on the property. In BHI's dispute response, BHI stated that all work had been completed which is absolutely not the case and is proven by the evidence. Furthermore, BHI references the county inspection as being completed thus verifying that all work has been completed. This is also not the case. The county inspector did nothing more than compare the engineer’s drawing against the porch, verified the correct number and types of doors and window were installed, and inspected the railing and stoop for fall risks. The inspector did not assess the quality of the work completed and did not pick-up a hose to ensure there were no water related issues. The inspector could not inspect the HVAC work as BHI choose, for whatever reason, to schedule the county inspection prior to installing the HVAC lines. Therefore, within BHI’s own dispute statement proof that not all work had been completed at the time of the inspection and that the statement is nothing more than an attempt to cover-up the actual events. Since the owner would not agree to voluntarily returning the money and allowing us to part ways, I dropped the dispute, for the sake of my girlfriend, due to the threat made by the owner. I finally contracted with another contractor to accomplish the following: Remove all windows and doors. Replace all bottom flashing with Z-flashing (BHI installed off-the-shelf roof flashing). Replace the incorrect 2” X 3” Patio Framing with the correct 3” X 2” Patio Framing. Reinstall all windows and doors. Wrap outside of posts with aluminum (BHI advised this could not be accomplished). Re-caulk entire porch inside and out. Clean-up of old Caulk inside and out. Install missing screen on window #1. Install missing plastic window stop on window #1. Install missing window installation caps and bumpers. Clean-up and repair of installation damages. One-year warranty. Additionally, my only option to resolve my HVAC cooling issues was to install a mini-split system at a cost of $3,200.00 and pay an additional $225.00 to have the supply and return lines installed by BHI capped-off. Throughout this entire ordeal I communicated with BHI via phone, email, and text. I re-arranged my schedule to make every effort to be home when I was told subcontractors would be there and they sometimes failed to show up or even call. It took BHI, based on when the HVAC work was attempted, over five months just to accomplish what they did when it should have taken at most three months to finish the project correctly. From the onset and prior to signing the contract, I was guaranteed by BHI they would complete all the required tasks within the time constraints I presented. That did not happen. Then BHI was given a second opportunity to correct the situation by signed an addendum stating they would complete the remaining work within 30 days. Again, that did not happen. Based on these missed timelines, broken promises, the chain of events as outlined above, BHI’s unprofessionalism, and BHI’s poor quality of workmanship, I terminated my relationship with BHI and obtained the professional services needed to fix BHI’s induced issues and complete my sun room.

- Joseph H.

This review is an attempt to alert those looking for a first class patio room installed by a first class company with a first class warranty to do their homework. In June of 2006 we had installed a patio room. As stated in an earlier review, it leaked at the first rain. Also stated in that review, was ...More not able to find or fix the leak and we had to call a professional roofer to fix it where the roof joined to the existing soffit. The leak was not in the existing soffit or roof.. After my earlier review of this company, the owner has responded that my review came "8 years after completion of the project". That is correct because the large pane of glass broke it's seal and clouded up 8 years after installation --and well within the warranty period. In the , 2014 review I clearly pointed out that would not stand by the warranty and told me that it would cost me $125 to have it replaced. I discovered that the "replacement" was sub-standard and not what we'd contracted for and the owner told me that he would now charge me $205 to replace the 1/2' thick pane with one equivalent to the original 3/4" one. In the owner's response the states "at no cost to the customer" he replaced the glass. That is simply not true and I have the cancelled check to prove it. We WERE charged to replace the defective pane that was supposed to be under warranty. This morning, while Googling in Lexington, KY I see that it has had it's BBB Accreditation revoked.
- Robert S.

Generally were good. Only complaint was the additional time it took - 4 weeks vs. 2 weeks originally projected. Scheduling issues mostly. Workmen were really superb.
- Steven L. P.

Patio And Sunroom Builders in Fayetteville, AR

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

24-7 Construction LLC

176 Ouachita 406

Abshier Construction

11648 Amy Avenue

Affordable Alterations

10138 snavely rd

AllPro Residential

P.O. Box 2315

B&D Construction Services, LLC

1416 Madison 6115

B-Squared Construction

27 Pivot Rock Rd
Eureka Springs

Bella Vista Contractors Inc

20 Syston Ln
Bella Vista

Bentonville Glass Inc.

507 South Main Street

Charles Wyles Contractors

2714 w perry

Commercial Property Solution

P.O. Box 53

Evans Construction & Remodeling LLC

1123 Crutcher St.


1206 N 2nd St.

Faulkinberry Enterprises, LLC

1401 S Walton Blvd

Fayetteville Ar Painting & Remodeling

3589-3 north Shiloh Dr

Frontier Building Co.

8363 Chestnut Dr

GreenBridge Builders

1702 Beth Dr.

Handy Services, Inc

19123 N Hwy 127

Hanke Brothers

PO Box 21174
Hot Springs

Home Works

938 N Eva Ave

iInspect, Home Inspection Services

Entire State of Arkansas
Little Rock

Inspired Design by Julie, LLC

400 South Ave Ste 301

Janacek Construction Inc

1812 S 26th St

Jat construction LLC

233 A jan elaine place

King Kustoms

703 Weston Cir
Cave Springs


1573 Windsor Avenue

Lockridge Construction

13926 Eastgate Dr

Magnolia Outdoor Living

3522 Ashford-Dunwoody Rd.

Marx Construction

1500 W Walnut



Midwest Construction Services

114 E. University
Siloam Springs

Moretto Plumbing & Design

1111 North Walton Blvd.

Mr Kleen's Home Improvement

13439 Taylor Orchard Rd.

NBS Services LLC

809 Gwen St

Nwa Home Services

2204 douglas

NWA Restore-It, Inc.

13525 W. Highway 102

Ozark Mountain Maintenance

5730 S Primrose Rd

Ozark Wood Care

12012 Hwy 187
Eureka Springs


13341 Tuttle rd

R & B Construction & Remodeling

20162 N. Hwy 127

R & R Custom Contractors

1111 Buckingham

Red Head Rehabs

1541 N Laurel Avenue

Residential Renovators

2511 N. 2nd St.

Richard's Custom Repair & Remodel

785 costales lane

S.T.P. Home Improvements

1318 W. Huntsville ave.

Sawyer's Outdoor Solutions

2028 N Shiloh Dr

Shane Helmer Construction

12204 Fat Nash Rd.

Sunrooms Plus

225 Meadow Court
Siloam Springs

Symphony Designs

5147 Har-Ber Ave

The Home Innovators

1126 E New Hope Rd

The Maintenance Co

414 Pinion Valley Dr
Bella Vista

Tim McMahon Building Co. Inc.

2355 Golden Oak

Wall & Ceiling Pro's

Po box 590


12637 S 265 W Suite 100

Wavelength Developments

5129 W Sandhurst

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