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Real People ~ Real Reviews ~ Real Results

  • Dr. Parker was rude, arrogant, and condescending. I’m told that there are better Rheumetologist’s in this practice, but since I already saw Dr. Parker, I am not allowed to switch doctors at all, so I have opted to drive to Houston to see a Rheumetologist there instead. I have never been treated so poorly by anyone that I have encountered in his profession. I felt like he was just there to collect his paycheck and didn’t even care about my concerns. I won’t be back.
    - Kelly D.
  • When Dr. Bingham read my blood oxygen levels, she immediately ordered me to go to the emergency room in an ambulance. That was it. No discussion. Under the Medical Liability Act, a physician can be liable for lack of informed consent if they do not disclose risks associated with particular treatment (O’Connor 676). Dr. Bingham failed to discuss the risks or benefits of going to the E.R. versus not going. She did not treat me like a reasonable adult of sound mind. I told her I did not want to go to the emergency room. I tried several times to tell her about my heart condition, and that low blood oxygen saturation is a symptom of my condition. This is normal for me. She tried to convince me that I had an additional symptom – that my lips and fingers were turning blue. They were not. I held up my hand next to her hand, and pointed to both our fingers. I showed her how mine was pink, similar to hers. She had nothing to say to that, but she did wave her hand in a very dismissive manner. She was disregarding everything I was telling her. She even told me that it would be illegal for her to let me leave on my own. I believe that is a lie. I can reference several examples of legal precedent, as well as published medical opinions on the issue of Informed Consent: 1. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford The US Supreme Court ruled that “no right is held more sacred or is more carefully guarded by the common law than the right of every individual to the possession and control of his own person, free from all restraint or interference of others” (Union Pacific Railway). 2. Mary E. Schloendorff v. The Society of the New York Hospital “Every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body” (Mary E. Schloendorff). 3. The American College of Physicians “Patients reserve the right to make informed decisions about their care, even if what they ultimately decide to do, or not to do, runs counter to medical advice” (D’Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). (Emphasis mine.) 4. In Re Mattie Brown, Supreme Court of Mississippi: “The informed consent rule rests upon the bedrock of this state’s respect for the individual’s right to be free from unwanted bodily intrusions no matter how well intentioned” (In Re Brown). (Emphasis mine) When I refused to go to the E.R., she brought in a male nurse to coerce me. It is important for me to note that I always choose a female doctor (whenever there is an option) because I feel more comfortable with female medical professionals. Bringing in a male nurse was very intimidating for me, and detrimental in my ability to feel safe, secure, and comfortable with regard to making decisions about my own course of action. This nurse’s name is Matthew Puckett. He is a very large, heavy set man, at least 6’ tall, and I’m 4’10” and 90 lbs. One of the first things he said when he walked into the room was “I know it must be scary for you to be sitting there half naked, and in walks this huge man, but you really need to...” Even the nurse himself realized that this was an intimidation tactic. Dr. Bingham failed her duty to the patient. A medical professional’s job is to clearly communicate medical advice with her patient. Instead, she brought in a large man to intimidate me into getting into an ambulance, and left the room. She left me alone, half-naked with a large intimidating man. I felt afraid, withdrawn, and violated, which is why I finally agreed to get in the ambulance. This decision was made under extreme duress, contrary to documented ethical standards for medical care: 5. The Texas Civil Practice & Remedies Code: “The duty to secure the patient’s informed consent rests on the physician treating the patient...not with a hospital, consultant, technician...who does not participate in the treatment” (O’Connor 677). 6. Office of Research Integrity, University of Tennessee: “Consent must be given without coercion or undue influence” (Informed Consent Requirements). 7. The American College of Physicians “Physicians themselves can be guilty of coercion by offering only one option for care” (D’ Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). After 6 hours and a bill totaling $9,095, I was discharged from Brackenridge Emergency Medical Center. Dr. Elizabeth Oehler concluded that the low blood oxygen level is normal for me. This is what my cardiologists have concluded my entire life, and this is exactly what I told Dr. Bingham. The issue I originally made the appointment for was never addressed, and I am still waiting to receive medical treatment for it. I am writing this with the hope that it might help those in a similar situation. The doctor works FOR YOU. YOU HIRE THEM, not the other way around. All too often, patients blindly take the word of their doctor’s as the gospel truth. Tests, lab work, x-rays, etc. can rack up exorbitant medical costs that are not always needed or wanted, because patients don’t realize they have a choice. In fact, no one is in charge of your own healthcare other than you. YOU need to educate yourself on your own medical history and healthcare. YOU need to become your own medical advocate. No one else is going to know you better than you. Yes, the doctor has superior medical knowledge, but they ARE NOT an authority figure. Modern healthcare is entrenched in a business model that prioritizes profits over patients, and doctors are too often focused on speed over care, and rarely spend more than 15 minutes with a patient. How can they possibly get to know the intimate details of your body in fifteen minutes once a year? I continue to deal with physical, psychological, and financial stress from that day’s events. In the past, the stress of merely discussing those events has triggered heart palpitations in me. The way I was treated in that office has caused me much more harm than if I had never gone to see Dr. Julie Bingham. I do not want anyone else to experience the psychological distress that I endured that day. No one should have to feel violated by someone who is supposedly a trusted professional. I urge you to consider the fact that doctors take a professional oath to uphold the high standards of ethics as well as treatment as written in the Hippocratic Oath. Please consider the words of Dean Louis Lasagna (Academic Dean of Tufts University) in his famous rewrite of the Hippocratic Oath (Bioethics)(Emphasis mine): I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow. I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of over-treatment and therapeutic nihilism. I will remember that there is ART TO MEDICINE as well as science, and that WARMTH, SYMPATHY, and UNDERSTANDING MAY OUTWEIGH THE SURGEON’S KNIFE or the chemist's drug. I WILL NOT BE ASHAMED TO SAY "I KNOW NOT," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery. I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know…Above all, I MUST NOT PLAY GOD. I will remember that I DO NOT TREAT A FEVER chart, a cancerous growth, BUT A SICK HUMAN BEING, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick. I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure. I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm. If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help. Patients, we must educate ourselves and advocate for ourselves when violations and ethical misconduct occur. Works Cited "Bioethics." Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries & University Museums 24 Sept. 2015 Home. Web. 3 Nov. 2015. D’Arrigo, Terri. “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice.” ACP Internist. 2014. American College of Physicians. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. "Informed Consent Requirements." Informed Consent Requirements. The University of Tennessee Office of Research Integrity. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. In Re Brown. Supreme Court of Mississippi. 30 Oct. 1985. Justia US Law. Justia, Oct.-Nov. 2015. Web. 8 Oct. 2015. Mary E. Schloendorff, Appellant, v. The Society of the New York Hospital. Court of Appeals of New York. 14 Apr. 1914. Consent and Informed Consent. LSU Law Center, Web. 5 Oct. 2015. O'Connor, Michol. "Causes of Action: Medical Malpractice--Informed Consent." O'Connor’s Causes of Action. 2014 ed. Jones McClure, 2014. 676-680. Print. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford. U.S. Supreme Court. 25 May 1981. Justia US Law. Justia, 2015. Web. 29 Sept. 2015.
    - Sabzeh N.
  • Jackie Turner did many things that broke cautious medical protocol. First she prescribed an antibiotic while telling the patient it was "certainly viral". This leads to greater amounts of harmful antibiotic resistant strains of any bacteria and is absolutely negligent.
    The providers took my daughter off the medication when the diarrhea started thinking it was the cause of the gastrointestinal problems. They refused to back up this medication after taking 9 pills, which is also another thing that leads to antibiotic resistant bacteria, and is a serious health concern.
    After my daughter had bloody diarrhea for over two weeks straight, Jackie Turner insisted that she return to school and refused a doctors note for my daughter for more than that day. At this time my daughter was still experiencing bloody diarrhea about 5 times a day and had been for two weeks. When I addressed concerns about this she yelled at me telling me that I was not a doctor, well, neither is she, in fact she is only a nurse practitioner, which is not even close to an MD. More than this, the providers had no idea at this time what was wrong with my daughter and there was not a definite diagnosis for the symptoms. She put an entire middle school at risk by saying this, considering my daughter did have Salmonella, confirmed by positive lab tests two weeks later.
    Then they called and told me she had also tested positive for Mono, when I know the Mono test was negative. This was a lie and confirmed by Dell Doctors another month later when my daughter had to be admitted to the hospital after being sick with diarrhea for 65 days. They even wrote a note for school stating that she was confirmed positive for Mononucleosis with positive lab tests, so they put their lies in writing. When I requested to see these tests, they refused to show me anything and kicked me out of the office. She was admitted to the hospital at Dell Childrens on 11/3/16 after becoming sick on 9/21/16, and was hospitalized for 4 days. During this hospital stay it was confirmed that My daughter never had mononucleosis by the team of Dell doctors, and when they phoned Jackie Turner, she then told them that my daughter was faking her illness. This led to me being accussed of Munchausen by proxy syndrome, which is an allegation of child abuse. We were cleared of these allegations but were subjected to over 3 weeks of psychological testing to be cleared, and in the meantime they would not treat my daughter for the salmonella or the arthritis that it caused. The clinic administrator told me when I asked him for a doctors note that stated she had salmonella to replace the one that said mono which was not accurate, he told me that "no one will ever know, just use that note for the school". What he didn't know is the school was well aware what was going on because Jackie's nurse Maria had also called the school and told them Mia was faking this illness. Long story short there is NO ethics with a single provider in this clinic. More than that they would rather blame a parent for child abuse than admit their own incompetence. I would never take my child to any provider with this clinic, or network of doctors in general, due to their complete negligence and lack of ethical decision making skills.
    - Julie T.
  • When Dr. Bingham read my blood oxygen levels, she immediately ordered me to go to the emergency room in an ambulance. That was it. No discussion. Under the Medical Liability Act, a physician can be liable for lack of informed consent if they do not disclose risks associated with particular treatment (O’Connor 676). Dr. Bingham failed to discuss the risks or benefits of going to the E.R. versus not going. She did not treat me like a reasonable adult of sound mind. I told her I did not want to go to the emergency room. I tried several times to tell her about my heart condition, and that low blood oxygen saturation is a symptom of my condition. This is normal for me. She tried to convince me that I had an additional symptom – that my lips and fingers were turning blue. They were not. I held up my hand next to her hand, and pointed to both our fingers. I showed her how mine was pink, similar to hers. She had nothing to say to that, but she did wave her hand in a very dismissive manner. She was disregarding everything I was telling her. She even told me that it would be illegal for her to let me leave on my own. I believe that is a lie. I can reference several examples of legal precedent, as well as published medical opinions on the issue of Informed Consent: 1. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford The US Supreme Court ruled that “no right is held more sacred or is more carefully guarded by the common law than the right of every individual to the possession and control of his own person, free from all restraint or interference of others” (Union Pacific Railway). 2. Mary E. Schloendorff v. The Society of the New York Hospital “Every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body” (Mary E. Schloendorff). 3. The American College of Physicians “Patients reserve the right to make informed decisions about their care, even if what they ultimately decide to do, or not to do, runs counter to medical advice” (D’Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). (Emphasis mine.) 4. In Re Mattie Brown, Supreme Court of Mississippi: “The informed consent rule rests upon the bedrock of this state’s respect for the individual’s right to be free from unwanted bodily intrusions no matter how well intentioned” (In Re Brown). (Emphasis mine) When I refused to go to the E.R., she brought in a male nurse to coerce me. It is important for me to note that I always choose a female doctor (whenever there is an option) because I feel more comfortable with female medical professionals. Bringing in a male nurse was very intimidating for me, and detrimental in my ability to feel safe, secure, and comfortable with regard to making decisions about my own course of action. This nurse’s name is Matthew Puckett. He is a very large, heavy set man, at least 6’ tall, and I’m 4’10” and 90 lbs. One of the first things he said when he walked into the room was “I know it must be scary for you to be sitting there half naked, and in walks this huge man, but you really need to...” Even the nurse himself realized that this was an intimidation tactic. Dr. Bingham failed her duty to the patient. A medical professional’s job is to clearly communicate medical advice with her patient. Instead, she brought in a large man to intimidate me into getting into an ambulance, and left the room. She left me alone, half-naked with a large intimidating man. I felt afraid, withdrawn, and violated, which is why I finally agreed to get in the ambulance. This decision was made under extreme duress, contrary to documented ethical standards for medical care: 5. The Texas Civil Practice & Remedies Code: “The duty to secure the patient’s informed consent rests on the physician treating the patient...not with a hospital, consultant, technician...who does not participate in the treatment” (O’Connor 677). 6. Office of Research Integrity, University of Tennessee: “Consent must be given without coercion or undue influence” (Informed Consent Requirements). 7. The American College of Physicians “Physicians themselves can be guilty of coercion by offering only one option for care” (D’ Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). After 6 hours and a bill totaling $9,095, I was discharged from Brackenridge Emergency Medical Center. Dr. Elizabeth Oehler concluded that the low blood oxygen level is normal for me. This is what my cardiologists have concluded my entire life, and this is exactly what I told Dr. Bingham. The issue I originally made the appointment for was never addressed, and I am still waiting to receive medical treatment for it. I am writing this with the hope that it might help those in a similar situation. The doctor works FOR YOU. YOU HIRE THEM, not the other way around. All too often, patients blindly take the word of their doctor’s as the gospel truth. Tests, lab work, x-rays, etc. can rack up exorbitant medical costs that are not always needed or wanted, because patients don’t realize they have a choice. In fact, no one is in charge of your own healthcare other than you. YOU need to educate yourself on your own medical history and healthcare. YOU need to become your own medical advocate. No one else is going to know you better than you. Yes, the doctor has superior medical knowledge, but they ARE NOT an authority figure. Modern healthcare is entrenched in a business model that prioritizes profits over patients, and doctors are too often focused on speed over care, and rarely spend more than 15 minutes with a patient. How can they possibly get to know the intimate details of your body in fifteen minutes once a year? I continue to deal with physical, psychological, and financial stress from that day’s events. In the past, the stress of merely discussing those events has triggered heart palpitations in me. The way I was treated in that office has caused me much more harm than if I had never gone to see Dr. Julie Bingham. I do not want anyone else to experience the psychological distress that I endured that day. No one should have to feel violated by someone who is supposedly a trusted professional. I urge you to consider the fact that doctors take a professional oath to uphold the high standards of ethics as well as treatment as written in the Hippocratic Oath. Please consider the words of Dean Louis Lasagna (Academic Dean of Tufts University) in his famous rewrite of the Hippocratic Oath (Bioethics)(Emphasis mine): I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow. I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of over-treatment and therapeutic nihilism. I will remember that there is ART TO MEDICINE as well as science, and that WARMTH, SYMPATHY, and UNDERSTANDING MAY OUTWEIGH THE SURGEON’S KNIFE or the chemist's drug. I WILL NOT BE ASHAMED TO SAY "I KNOW NOT," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery. I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know…Above all, I MUST NOT PLAY GOD. I will remember that I DO NOT TREAT A FEVER chart, a cancerous growth, BUT A SICK HUMAN BEING, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick. I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure. I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm. If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help. Patients, we must educate ourselves and advocate for ourselves when violations and ethical misconduct occur. Works Cited "Bioethics." Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries & University Museums 24 Sept. 2015 Home. Web. 3 Nov. 2015. D’Arrigo, Terri. “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice.” ACP Internist. 2014. American College of Physicians. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. "Informed Consent Requirements." Informed Consent Requirements. The University of Tennessee Office of Research Integrity. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. In Re Brown. Supreme Court of Mississippi. 30 Oct. 1985. Justia US Law. Justia, Oct.-Nov. 2015. Web. 8 Oct. 2015. Mary E. Schloendorff, Appellant, v. The Society of the New York Hospital. Court of Appeals of New York. 14 Apr. 1914. Consent and Informed Consent. LSU Law Center, Web. 5 Oct. 2015. O'Connor, Michol. "Causes of Action: Medical Malpractice--Informed Consent." O'Connor’s Causes of Action. 2014 ed. Jones McClure, 2014. 676-680. Print. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford. U.S. Supreme Court. 25 May 1981. Justia US Law. Justia, 2015. Web. 29 Sept. 2015.
    - Sabzeh N.
  • When Dr. Bingham read my blood oxygen levels, she immediately ordered me to go to the emergency room in an ambulance. That was it. No discussion. Under the Medical Liability Act, a physician can be liable for lack of informed consent if they do not disclose risks associated with particular treatment (O’Connor 676). Dr. Bingham failed to discuss the risks or benefits of going to the E.R. versus not going. She did not treat me like a reasonable adult of sound mind. I told her I did not want to go to the emergency room. I tried several times to tell her about my heart condition, and that low blood oxygen saturation is a symptom of my condition. This is normal for me. She even tried to convince me that I had an additional symptom – that my lips and fingers were turning blue. They were not. I held up my hand next to her hand, and pointed to both our fingers. I showed her how mine was pink, similar to hers. She had nothing to say to that, but she did wave her hand in a very dismissive manner. She was disregarding everything I was telling her. She even told me that it would be illegal for her to let me leave on my own. I believe that is a lie. I can reference several examples of legal precedent, as well as published medical opinions on the issue of Informed Consent: 1. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford The US Supreme Court ruled that “no right is held more sacred or is more carefully guarded by the common law than the right of every individual to the possession and control of his own person, free from all restraint or interference of others” (Union Pacific Railway). 2. Mary E. Schloendorff v. The Society of the New York Hospital “Every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body” (Mary E. Schloendorff). 3. The American College of Physicians “Patients reserve the right to make informed decisions about their care, even if what they ultimately decide to do, or not to do, runs counter to medical advice” (D’Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). (Emphasis mine.) 4. In Re Mattie Brown, Supreme Court of Mississippi: “The informed consent rule rests upon the bedrock of this state’s respect for the individual’s right to be free from unwanted bodily intrusions no matter how well intentioned” (In Re Brown). (Emphasis mine) When I refused to go to the E.R., she brought in a male nurse to coerce me. It is important for me to note that I always choose a female doctor (whenever there is an option) because I feel more comfortable with female medical professionals. Bringing in a male nurse was very intimidating for me, and detrimental in my ability to feel safe, secure, and comfortable with regard to making decisions about my own course of action. This nurse’s name is Matthew Puckett. He is a very large, heavy set man, at least 6’ tall, and I’m 4’10” and 90 lbs. One of the first things he said when he walked into the room was “I know it must be scary for you to be sitting there half naked, and in walks this huge man, but you really need to...” Even the nurse himself realized that this was an intimidation tactic. Dr. Bingham failed her duty to the patient. A medical professional’s job is to clearly communicate medical advice with her patient. Instead, she brought in a large man to intimidate me into getting into an ambulance, and left the room. She left me alone, half-naked with a large intimidating man. I felt afraid, withdrawn, and violated, which is why I finally agreed to get in the ambulance. This decision was made under extreme duress, contrary to documented ethical standards for medical care: 5. The Texas Civil Practice & Remedies Code: “The duty to secure the patient’s informed consent rests on the physician treating the patient...not with a hospital, consultant, technician...who does not participate in the treatment” (O’Connor 677). 6. Office of Research Integrity, University of Tennessee: “Consent must be given without coercion or undue influence” (Informed Consent Requirements). 7. The American College of Physicians “Physicians themselves can be guilty of coercion by offering only one option for care” (D’ Arrigo, “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice”). After 6 hours and a bill totaling $9,095, I was discharged from Brackenridge Emergency Medical Center. Dr. Elizabeth Oehler concluded that the low blood oxygen level is normal for me. This is what my cardiologists have concluded my entire life, and this is exactly what I told Dr. Bingham. The issue I originally made the appointment for was never addressed, and I am still waiting to receive medical treatment for it. I am writing this with the hope that it might help those in a similar situation. The doctor works FOR YOU. YOU HIRE THEM, not the other way around. All too often, patients blindly take the word of their doctor’s as the gospel truth. Tests, lab work, x-rays, etc. can rack up exorbitant medical costs that are not always needed or wanted, because patients don’t realize they have a choice. In fact, no one is in charge of your own healthcare other than you. YOU need to educate yourself on your own medical history and healthcare. YOU need to become your own medical advocate. No one else is going to know you better than you. Yes, the doctor has superior medical knowledge, but they ARE NOT an authority figure. Modern healthcare is entrenched in a business model that prioritizes profits over patients, and doctors are too often focused on speed over care, and rarely spend more than 15 minutes with a patient. How can they possibly get to know the intimate details of your body in fifteen minutes once a year? I continue to deal with physical, psychological, and financial stress from that day’s events. In the past, the stress of merely discussing those events has triggered heart palpitations in me. The way I was treated in that office has caused me much more harm than if I had never gone to see Dr. Julie Bingham. I do not want anyone else to experience the psychological distress that I endured that day. No one should have to feel violated by someone who is supposedly a trusted professional. I urge you to consider the fact that doctors take a professional oath to uphold the high standards of ethics as well as treatment as written in the Hippocratic Oath. Please consider the words of Dean Louis Lasagna (Academic Dean of Tufts University) in his famous rewrite of the Hippocratic Oath (Bioethics)(Emphasis mine): I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow. I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of over-treatment and therapeutic nihilism. I will remember that there is ART TO MEDICINE as well as science, and that WARMTH, SYMPATHY, and UNDERSTANDING MAY OUTWEIGH THE SURGEON’S KNIFE or the chemist's drug. I WILL NOT BE ASHAMED TO SAY "I KNOW NOT," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery. I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know…Above all, I MUST NOT PLAY GOD. I will remember that I DO NOT TREAT A FEVER chart, a cancerous growth, BUT A SICK HUMAN BEING, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick. I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure. I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm. If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help. I am deeply grateful for the good medical treatment I have received in the past from honorable physicians, and refuse to let this singular incident tarnish my trust in medical professionals as a whole. Patients, we must educate ourselves and advocate for ourselves when violations and ethical misconduct occur. Works Cited "Bioethics." Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries & University Museums 24 Sept. 2015 Home. Web. 3 Nov. 2015. . D’Arrigo, Terri. “Look for Reasons If Patients Refuse Advice.” ACP Internist. 2014. American College of Physicians. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. . "Informed Consent Requirements." Informed Consent Requirements. The University of Tennessee Office of Research Integrity. Web. 5 Oct. 2015. . In Re Brown. Supreme Court of Mississippi. 30 Oct. 1985. Justia US Law. Justia, Oct.-Nov. 2015. Web. 8 Oct. 2015. . Mary E. Schloendorff, Appellant, v. The Society of the New York Hospital. Court of Appeals of New York. 14 Apr. 1914. Consent and Informed Consent. LSU Law Center, Web. 5 Oct. 2015. . O'Connor, Michol. "Causes of Action: Medical Malpractice--Informed Consent." O'Connor’s Causes of Action. 2014 ed. Jones McClure, 2014. 676-680. Print. Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Botsford. U.S. Supreme Court. 25 May 1981. Justia US Law. Justia, 2015. Web. 29 Sept. 2015. .
    - Sabzeh N.
  • She is a wonderful doctor, very kind, and diligent. Her bedside manner could not be better. The staff are all very pleasant and helpful. Scheduling is very easy. They couldn't be nicer or more accommodating.
    - JEAN C.
  • As always, the visit went well! The last few years I've had health issues; strokes, seizures and congestive heart failure...lot's of fun. He is the one I trust. Professional, personable, informative and he listens to me. Quote, " Tim, you've been in your body all your life, talk to me." Then if a specialist is required he refers me to someone HE trusts. In my opinion, he is the most honest hearted doctor in Austin. Also, he is the only one I will let prescribe medications for this 66 year old widower. In short, he works well with others. He is well educated but humble. If I have questions he answers me! A wise man once said " people don't care how much you know until they know how much you care." Keep up the good work Doc!
    - TIM P.
  • At best this office is incompetent. It took no less than five phone calls every month (by both the pharmacy and myself even after a visit) just to get a refill on a prescription. Ever visit they would leave out something that I came in for and add something that I didn't just so I had to come back in and pay another co-pay. She wrongly diagnosed me asthma (I had just completed a triathlon) by adding a spirometry test (which she said was part of routine physical) and 'treating' with inhalers that gave me lung problems for the first time in my life. I would avoid this practice!!!
    - chris c.
  • The experience depends on the provider.  Dr. Kroll is excellent, and this coming from a man who spent 30 years as the the head of administration or CEO of Mayo-Scottsdale and Penn Medicine.  Dr. Aventa and Dr. Ondash are pitiful examples of physicians--rude and arrogant.  Unfortunately, Dr. Kroll is not accepting new patients, so he will not accept my wife as a patient.  So we will travel to Mayo or Penn for our healthcare.
    - ROBERT M.
  • He is a nice guy. He is a good doctor. I don't like the clinic much. I'm really p*ssed off at them. It takes a few days to get in, but that's not unusual for a doctor's office. I can never get in the same day of course, but I can usually get in within a few days. Dr. Haydon has been really good but some of the other doctors are not. I have scars on my body from them where they screwed up. I went in to get a joint injection and the next day I had a staph infection at the injection site. Unfortunately, that part of my shoulder rubbed up against my ear that night so I woke up with my ear purple and swollen. It was horrible. I tried them to do something to compensate me for losing a piece of my ear and this scar on my shoulder, and after 2 years of them considering it, they decided not to help me out at all on it. It really p*ssed me off. Dr. Haydon is good but I think the administration office really su*ked. That injection turned out pretty poor, but Dr. Haydon is always good. There are a lot of different doctors in that clinic and if I can't get in to see my doctor, I can usually go to another doctor. I'm so stupid. I was thinking a joint infection is no big deal, anybody can do that. I guess not. I really like Dr. Haydon.
    - Beverly B.
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