Who Should I Hire to Install Fire Sprinklers?

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Eric Sigmen

Subject: Incorrect information in article

The original contributor of this article incorrectly states: "Fire sprinklers are programmed to automatically turn on when smoke is detected ..." This is a common misconception/misunderstanding of how fire sprinklers operate and should be corrected in this article. Fire Sprinklers are manufactured with an individual heat sensitive element in each sprinkler head that activates only when the temperature required is reached. Most residential sprinkler heads are made to activate in the 155 degrees Fahrenheit range. This means that only the heads that reach the designed temperature will activate in a fire and in the case of smoke being present without high heat, such as badly burnt toast or microwave popcorn, no sprinkler activation will take place. This is important to address since this continues to be one of the biggest misconceptions and obstacles to the general public accepting the value of fire sprinkler systems in homes, for fear of water damage when all of the heads go off in the house. Typically only one and sometimes 2 heads will activate in the case of a fire and those are applying water directly to the fire and not wasting it on portions of the home where no fire is present.
Additionally, although some states do permit Plumbers to install and maintain fire sprinkler systems, the technical aspects and specialized nature of the codes applicable to the Fire Sprinkler systems warrant seeking an experienced Fire Protection Contractor to design and perform the work since that is the primary focus of their business. Whereas many plumbers only do it as an occasional add-on to their overall home plumbing scope of work.

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I second the original question (still unanswered). Speaking as someone who logged in today to try to find an attorney, I see this category as one that's exactly what I have my Angie's List membership for:

1. It's important that I find a good one
2. I'm not an expert enough to know myself who is a good one
3. The industry is full of advertisements and misinformation
4. I wish I knew what experiences other people have had


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I don't care about lawns--I planted mine in clover and don't have to mow it. When I do need to mow I use a rotary Fiskars mower, which is great--or a scythe. That's right--a scythe (the European type, which is smaller, and it's very good exercise). Gas-powered mowers, chemical fertilizers and weed killers--all nasty stuff that gets into everyone's air, soil, and water. I'm sure my neighbor doesn't like my wildflowers, semi-wild pockets of fruit bushes, and unmown areas and yes, dandelions (I have 10 acres) but that's too bad. It's better habitat for wildlife, especially the pollinators on which our food supply depends. I think this obsession with the Great American Lawn is a waste of time and resources. Plant some food instead.


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I'm not sure Angie et. al. want you to have a complete answer to this question. By re-subscribing at the Indiana State Fair in 2012, I think I paid $20.00 per year for a multi- year subscription. Maybe even less. At the other extreme--and I hope my memory isn't faulty about this--I think the price, for my area, for ONE year was an outrageous $70.00. And they debited me automatically without warning. I had to opt out of that automatic charge. I like Angie's List, but if some of the companies they monitor behaved the way they do in this respect, they'd be on some sort of Pages of Unhappiness. I'll be interested to see if this comment gets published or censored out of existence.
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That's very difficult to answer without seeing the house. As one poster said, the prep is the most important part. On newer homes that don't have a lot of peeling paint, the prep can be very minimal even as low as a couple or a few hundred dollars for the prep labor.

On a 100 year old home with 12 coats of peeling paint on it, then the prep costs can be very high and can easily exceed 50% of the job's labor cost.

A 2100 sq ft two story home could easily cost $1000 just for the labor to prep for the paint job. That number could climb too. Throw in lots of caullking  or window glazing, and you could be talking a couple or a few hundred dollars more for labor.

Painting that home with one coat of paint and a different color on the trim could run roughly $1000 or more just for labor. Add a second coat  and that could cost close to another $1000 for labor.

For paint, you may need 20 gallons of paint. You can pay from $30-$70 for a gallon of good quality exterior paint. The manufacturer of the paint should be specified in any painting contract. Otherwise, the contractor could bid at a Sherwin-Williams $60 per gallon paint and then paint the house with $35 Valspar and pocket the difference. $25 dollars per gallon times 20 gallons? That's a pretty penny too.

That was the long answer to your question. The short answer is $2000 to $4000 and up, depending upon the amount of prep, the number of coats, the amount of trim, and the paint used.