How Swimming Pool Costs Can Add Up

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valia feinstein

Subject: pool /investment

We live in Boston area with unpredictable weather. The pool season is short. To keep the pool looking great and feeling terrific requires an investment in cost and time... and never the less it is our favorite resource. Done well -- it does not have to be too expensive. Like a classy outfit, less is often more and shiny does not always gorgeous make.... It is a great part of gorgeous landscape of our backyard, our favorite place to rest, exercise and relax and you should see our six grandchildren enjoying every minute of spending time in and near it... The costs could be spread over time... some things need to be done in stage one and many can be added from year to year... some things need to be done by professionals and some can be DIY... make a master plan and budget, a schedule, a line item list of tasks and take it from there.

Steve

Subject: pool costs

Depending on your location, and how much you can do yourself, you are looking at $300-700 opening and closing costs each year, $100-400 for chemicals, costs for electricity to run the equipment, higher property taxes (for me, in IN, roughly $650-700 each year!) and all sorts of misc. expenses that always seem to just keep coming. Unless I win the lottery, my next house will never have a pool!

Salvador Camacho

Subject: Swimming pool

In New Orleans a swimming pool is a god send. I use mine most every day for about 8 months. It's my main exercise & relief from the brutal heat. It's a good investment if you make use of it. I chose an above ground pool 25 ft. round with a strong motor aimed to create a current a can swim against for a better work or just go with the flow for a lazy swim. My investment was under $5000 total & I let the grass grow around the pool so I feel more like being in a natural environment & not surrounded by concrete, plus a whole lot cheaper. The biggest cost is maintaining the pool & upkeep. If you keep the chemical balances in check, you can keep the costs under control. I built the fence with my tenant's help & saved lots of money. I love my pool & I'm not in the poor house with heavy maintenance expenses if something goes wrong with an in ground pool. Enjoy your swim if you decide on a pool. Peace, Sal

Teri

Subject: Pool removal costs

When I'm tired if the cost of a pool and want to get it removed, are there hidden costs I should consider?

Cynthia Wilson
Cynthia Wilson

Subject: removing a pool

There could be.  If the location of your pool is hard to reach, then the excavator will have to use small equipment to get to the space and it will take longer to do the work.  Also, local demolition codes will dictate how the work is done. For example, can you can fill in the pool or do a partial removal or will you have to completely remove the pool. Check with your local building and planning department before you do anything. If you hire someone to fill-in or remove your pool, you'll want to know that the contractor is doing it right. 

 


 

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My order of preference - first choice a jacuzzi/hot tub repairman (from a jacuzzi/hot tub/sauna distributor), second choice a plumber (many do not work on hot tubs, jacuzzi's and sauna because they cnanot afford to stock parts). An electrician might be able to fix it if it is a connection problem, but such motors are seldom repaired if the problem is internal, just replaced - which would be a jacuzzi repairman/plumber type job.
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You will have to find out what your model costs new - looks like they run from about $400 to 1700 depending on size. IF yours is at the lower end, might be just as cheap to replace it, with parts and labor. If not low end, then repair probably works. Typical pricing of components that might have gone out - switch $80, timer/control unit $130, heating element $100 (probably most likely to have failed) - so if only one of these went out, figuring $100-200 labor, probably cheaper to fix it. I would contact your dealer for a better idea.

BTW - here is a Saunatec instruction on maintenance on the heating element and rocks, failure to follow can shorten heating element life, if that is what went out (and probably the simplest to replace) - 

http://superiorsaunas.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=2