Chicago Carbon Monoxide Deaths a Reminder to Protect Your Family

Chicago Carbon Monoxide Deaths a Reminder to Protect Your Family

High levels of carbon monoxide are being blamed for the death of an elderly couple on Chicago’s South Side over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. 

According to reports, an elderly couple in the city’s Calumet Heights neighborhood was pronounced dead at about 5:55 p.m. Nov. 29 after police were called to the home for a well-being check.

The Cook County Medical Examiner’s office said a carbon monoxide leak from the exhaust of a natural gas appliance was to blame for the deaths. 

The deaths come a little more than a week after another South Side family was hospitalized when lethal levels of carbon monoxide were found in their home.

An elderly man, two daughters and a grandchild were found unconscious in the home and rushed to area hospitals, according to reports. The family was treated and released after recovering.

How to protect against carbon monoxide poisoning

These recent incidents highlight the importance of protecting  your family from the colorless and odorless gas.

The first and most important step is installing a working carbon monoxide detector on every level of your home. Installation is a fairly easy do-it-yourself project, but can also be handled by a qualified HVAC professional

In addition to CO detectors, there are several other steps homeowners should take to prevent deadly leaks.

  • Hire a pro — Never install gas-fueled appliances without the help of a qualified professional. Such appliances require proper venting to prevent harmful CO build-up. 
  • Perform regular maintenance — Professional annual check-ups of carbon monoxide emitting appliances and gas fireplaces can ensure that only trace amounts of CO are entering your home upon start-up. Regular inspections of the venting systems of your furnace and hot water heater can detect unsafe leaks or blockage. 
  • Keep gas-powered tools outside — Never operate a gas-powered generator or similarly powered tools inside your home or without proper ventilation outside the home. Moving a generator to your garage without adequate ventilation is also dangerous.

RELATED: How to Protect Your Family from the Year-Round Risk of Carbon Monoxide


More Like This

N.C. Hotel Deaths a Reminder of Carbon Monoxide Danger at Home

carbonmonoxidedetector.jpg

A carbon monoxide detector can alert homeowners to odorless but potentially deadly gas leaks. (Photo courtesy of Angie's List member James T. of Arden, N.C.)
A carbon monoxide detector can alert homeowners to odorless but potentially deadly gas leaks. (Photo courtesy of Angie's List member James T. of Arden, N.C.)

Deaths in N.C. caused by carbon monoxide gas poisoning prompt changes. Experts suggest all homes, especially those with gas appliances, should have a working CO detector.

Post New Comment

Deals

What is Angie's List?

Angie’s List is the trusted site where more than 3 million households go to get ratings and reviews on everything from home repair to health care. Stop guessing when it comes to hiring! Check Angie’s List to find out who does the best work in town.

Local Discounts

Daily deals up to 70% off popular home improvement projects from top-rated contractors on Angie’s List!