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A
"This was the second company I had come for an estimate. The first company had an estimator that went into the
with the light from his cell" phone, looked around from the doorway, and went and wrote a quote. Used the sq footage from zillow. Pressured me to book right then and said if I waited even a day, they might not be able to get to me in time. (
14 estimate for a request completion date of
29)
came the same day and the estimator suited up and spent 20 minutes down there. Measured himself and spent time explaining other things he noticed while in the
. Price was $225 less. Every interaction with the office was great. The technician arrived on time and did a fantastic job as well as showing me things he found under the house. Cleaned up outside very nicely and instead of using foam spray on areas he found small holes, he used cement. Nice job! Highly recommend
!

-Teddi C P.

D
"It started off great and I was really impressed with how professional and knowledgeable they were. They removed our old insulation however, they did not use any" sort of ventilation nor did they warned us about inflation fibers becoming airborne in our house. My daughter had a severe respiratory allergic reaction and had to be rushed to the hospital. She had no prior problems with her respiratory system. I was informed by the doctor and other sources that it is customary to make a tunnel from the extraction point to the door in order to prevent this from happening as well as to use a ventilation system to movie fibers out of the house. When I approach them about the problem they were sympathetic, but offered it no recourse and not once did anyone ask how my daughter was doing. They we're unapologetic and didn't even offer to discount us the cost of our medical bills incurred because of this invident.

-Susan H.

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Local Articles in Veneta

Avoid ice dams with proper attic insulation

Do you have icicles forming on your eaves and gutters and ice collecting on your roof? An ice dam can cause serious problems without proper insulation.

While traditional fiberglass insulation is affordable and efficient, injection foam insulation can offer even more benefits. (Photo by Summer Galyan)
Insulation

Insulation isn't sexy, but it can keep you cool at night.

Better air quality, quieter living spaces, comfort and better health are all reasons to reconsider your insulation choices. (Photo courtesy of Angie's List member Roseanne J. of Seattle)
Insulation

Not just for new construction, learn how foam insulation can be placed inside existing walls to make your home more comfortable.

By properly insulating your attic you can keep warm air from escaping and save money on your energy bills. (Photo courtesy of Vinay S. of North Brunswick, New Jersey)
Insulation

Hot air rises … but good insulation can keep your energy costs from doing the same thing.

Even in cold-weather climates, homes often lack insulation between the finished, occupied portion of the home and the ground. (Photo courtesy of Angie's List member Paul B. of Bluffton, South Carolina)
Insulation, Energy Efficiency Auditing

Exterior foundation insulation is an often overlooked home improvement. It can help stop drafts, lower energy bills and keep your house warmer during winter.

Angie's Answers

?

If you go the Better Business Bureau website you can see that the company has only had two complaints in the last 18 months and that they have both been resolved.  The company has an A+ rating.  This is not something you can buy.

 

There are genuine reviews on many 3rd party online review sites including AngiesList and the Better Business Bureau.  Simply do a Google search for "Smart Energy Today Reviews".

 

Sol Blanket Insulation acts as a radiant barrier, insulation and a vapor barrier.  It is not intended to replace traditional insulation but in fact compliments it and adds to it's ability to keep cool/hot air (depending on the season) in the home when the envelope of the home is properly sealed.  

 

Every attic is different and there are many other components that must be considered.  You mentioned an attic fan as well.  The heat that is radiated away from the ceiling by the Sol-Blanket Insulation is pushed out of the attic with an attic fan.  The US Department of Energy states that radiant barriers do work and suggest they be installed by professionals.

 

As with any product by any company if the product is not installed properly and other factors (attic fan, caulking and sealing, etc...) are not addressed then it will not be as effective.

?

A couple of comments about what Jim said:

1) Regarding type of insulation, in cold winter environments: Cellulose and fiberglass are actually about comparable in R value when installed - blown in cellulose runs from 3.2-3.8 R value, fiberglass batt 2.9-4.3 R value depending on manufacturer and whether hig-density or low density, high-efficiency or standard, according to official Department of Energy publications. Measured values in attic test cases, in areas with a true winter, after 10 years showed a decrease from 3.4 (in the test case) down to 2.1 for cellulose, and 3.5 to 3.3 for fiberglass batt, due to packing or matting. In an attic environment, there WILL be condensation or frost on the insulation at some point during the year (assuming an area with true winters) and in highly insulated houses commonly for a substantial time period each winter. Fiberglass packs down slightly from that weight but mostly rebounds, cellulose packs down and mats and does not substantially recover, so over the years cellulose loses 1/3 to close to 1/2 its insulation value, fiberglass about 10%.

2) a note on radiation barriers attached to the bottom of the rafters - there are a lot of installers and homeowners making two major mistakes with this product that can cause major trouble: First, be sure to terminate it short of the eave openings. I have seen cases where it was carried all the way out to the fascia board, thereby blocking all airflow on the underside of the roof. Even carrying it all the way to the eaves along the bottom of the rafters will block off ventilation to the main attic area. You have to leave the air space between the rafters open to full airflow from the soffit/eave area ot the ridge vent. Second, do NOT run it continuous from eave to eave across the full width of the attic - leave a gap about a foot wide under the ridge vents so warm and moist air in the attic can vent through the ridge vent. Closing the ridge vent area off with the radiant barrier effectively puts a vapor barrier around the main attic area, causing retention of the moisture which WILL accumulate there, promoting mold.

?

Obviously this is not a timely response to the initial question. However, for those who may be reading these answers at a later time, a couple of added thoughts:

1) the radiant barrier being discussed is basically heavy-duty metal foil or metallized surface on a plastic sheet, intended to reflect RADIATED heat (infrared radiation - think heat light, or heat you can feel at a distance radiated from a fireplace), the same way a mirror reflects light. Radiated heat is how a standard oven broils and how steam and hot water baseboard heat predominately work.

2) you generally should do NOT place a radiant barrier over the insulation that lies between and over the joists in a normal attic, especially in a region where the attic temperature can frequently reach condensation temperature (below about 45-50 degrees) - it may reflect back some of the house heat that is coming up from the house, but by destroying most of the temperature gradient from the house to the attic air destroys much of the driving force that moves moisture to the attic air and subsequent venting. Between that greater heat and the fact the barrier is also a moisture barrier, that makes a perfect condition for mold and rot in your insulation and attic wood, and has become quite an issue in energy upgraded homes because of retrofits that cut off airflow outside the insulation, but do not cut off the moisture source leaking thorough from the house. The proper and ONLY place for a vapor barrier in a normal attic insulation system is on the pressurized and normal warm, humid side of the insulation zone - directly above the ceiling drywall in the top floor, fastened to the UNDERSIDE of the ceiling joists or trusses, NOT anywhere above that. Perforated barriers are supposed to reduce this tendency, but the perforation area percentage is so small that typically they still act as a vapor varrier, just not a totally effective one.

3) radiant barriers reflect radiated heat ewith up to 99% efficiency but have basically zero resistance to CONDUCTION (body to body heat transfer at points of contact - think heat transfer from your warm hand to a frozen cold drink can, or hot pavement heat transfer to the bottom of your feet) - so there needs to be an air gap between the radiant barrier and the hot item passing the heat to it, otherwise the heat will just pass through it by conduction. Therefore, applying it directly to the sheathing (above or below) or manufacturing it directly on the surface of the sheathing defeats its purpose, even though this is commonly done.

4) there is a lot of discussion, particularly in the professional design community, about attic radiant heat barrier effectiveness and problems. Because they are being installed on the bottom of the sheathing or underside of roof joists, they act as a heat trap for the energy being conducted through the roof which would normally radiate into the attic air or be transferred by CONVECTION (fluid flow heat transfer) to the attic air, and be vented through roof vents, ridge vents, gable vents, etc. By trapping that heat, they are causing the underside of the shingles and particularly the felt and sheathing to get a lot hotter than they otherside would, essentially changing it from a system where the shingle top surface might reach 120-180 F and the inside surface of the sheathing about 80-140F in the summer, to making the entire roof system equal to the outside surface temperature. This causes more rapid shingle deterioration and cracking, and makes the felt or plastic moisture barrier under the shingles brittle and subject to failure.

Also, any moisture above the radiant barrier (from roof leaks or humid air coming into the area) is prevented from evaporating by the attic airflow which would normally remove it, so it starts acting like a steamer. I have seen both wood and metal lofts and attics become a major mold farm in months because of this effect, and a couple of roofs which started sagging due to rotted sheathing within 2 years of reroofing with tightly adhered radiant barrier. Some radiant barriers are vapor-permeable to reduce the moisture issue, many are not, but few actually are effective in letting moisture freely escape.

Having seen these products in use, and having analyzed and specified building products for use from the Middle East to the Arctic for decades, and having a Masters in Arctic Engineering (a degree predominately in energy conservation and heat flow), my personal opinion is that these radiant barriers will be banned by code within 10-15 years for unheated (so-called "cold" roofs) roofs, because they just do not use the principles of thermodynamics correctly. For more info on this issue Google the following search phrase  - moisture trapping by radiant attic barriers       and read the government (not the manufacturer) literature on the issue.

5) Unfortunately, the right way to handle this issue is to put the radiant surface on the OUTSIDE of the house - by using reflective materials on the roofing material. This is already done with flat roofs, house trailers, and industrial structures by spraying with alumiunum paint, and a few brands offer reflective aggregate shingles that are slightly more reflective and radiant than normal shingles. People obviously do not like this reflective surface from an aesthetic standpoint, though with solar cells coming into more general use this may soon be more widely adopted. The idea should be to keep the solar energy from penetrating into the building envelope at all, not try to re-reflect it away after it has penetrated throguh the roof system.

The sprayed-in foam has a couple of issues you need to be aware of:

6) it needs to be the low-pressure expanding type mixed for use around window frames, as fully expanding foam can bow joists or trusses and pop drywall ceilings free as it expands, and non-expanding foam actually shrinks as it cures, leaving gaps for air and heat flow alongside the ceiling joists.

7) being closed-cell it is essentially impervious to moisture, so the vapor barrier on the house side has to be EXCELLENT (incuding sealingof all penetrations), or it will trap household moisture escaping into the attic and promote mold and rot in the ceiling drywall and joists.

8) it tends to bleed chemical fumes into the house for a long period of time (can be noticeable for years), which may be objectionable to some people from an odor or environmental standpoint, and especially should be considered if any residents have severe allergy issues or respiratory problems.

9) I emphatically recommend AGAINST use of sprayed-in foam between ceiling joists or truss members in any area that can have cold attic air that could cause moisture condensation in the insulation, though this is probably not a significant problem where you live, assuming your Dallas is the city in Texas. For essentially year-around air-conditioned homes in hot climates, the problem can actually be condensation of attic air moisture on and in the colder ceiling surface insulation and on cold attic runs of air conditioned air, so attic ventilation becomes a critical issue to remove the moisture before it condenses.

In summary, having seen an awful lot of attic moisture and thermal problems, my personal recommendation would be to ensure excellent sealing of the house from the attic, use normal UNFACED fiberglass insulation, and instead of a radiant barrier ensure adequate full-attic ventilation. If you decide to got with a radiant barrier, then I would recommend a perforated one, sloping up towards the sides a foot or two and stopping a foot or so clear at the sides so moist air under it can escape to the roof joist spaces and be vented from the attic. I have seen this done several times with a fine nylon net strung above the insulation in the attic, supporting the barrier, resulting in something very similar to the double-roof system used in bedouin tents, where airflow between the two layers keep the hot air away from the living space.

?
Steve made a good point.  Also, while it isn't required to remove the old insulation you can check the ductwork, wiring, etc. with the old stuff removed,  You can also spray foam around all openings and holes in wall top plates to better seal your home as Steve was pointing out.  My concern is the potential for mold spores you mentioned in your question.  If you suspect there are any get a good company in to remove the old and clean the attic.  Another concern is asbestos.  Your home is old enough you could have it in there and that's worse than mold if released into the air.

Todd Shell
Todd's Home Services
?

A moisture barrier has to be on the warm side ie towards the heated side.  Most people would not install a moisture barrier in your situation.  (They also sell a paint that you can use on your interior ceiling? as a moisture barrier).  Rather most homeowners would hire an insulation contractor to blow a cap over the existing insulation bringing it up to your areas reccomended levels,,Your power company can tell you the level, I would guess R 40.  What you use is up to your wallet, the best is a spray foam that can be applied to the ceiling or over the whole shebang.  Being a bit of a miser I would trot on down to my local big box store and buy a truckload of cellulose and get a free blower for I and a friend to self insulte.  Big box= Menards, Lowes etc.  Cellulose= ground up paper treated with boron for insect control and fireproofing.  It has a high R value and will stop moving air loss from the home. Before you cap current mostly emply attic is ideal time to take sealant to any openings in the attic floor,  like pocket doors, canister lights electircal wires and close off the air leaks from inside.  If foaming skip this.  Hot air rises so you save yourself a ton air sealing the home.

An attic radiant barrier is also a possiblity see my blog for nifty results on it.

Jim Casper Old Energy Conservation Guru

ps moving existing insulation use a plastic rake

?

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Insulation reviews in Veneta

F

Rating
Has not contacted me after initial visit to just look in my attic. I was told that the work would be completed within the week. it is now over a month and no contact. Not sure how people do business like this. Take someone's money then no call and no service. I am the customer. I should not have to track down the company to come out and complete the work. I want the money refunded. period. This is not how I expect to be treated by a company that is rated this high on Angie's List. A
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
call would have sufficed. Too late now.
- Patrick G.
A

Rating
Excellent! Quality work, polite, courteous, arrived on time, cleaned up and worked efficiently. Work completed quickly and same day.
- Gary & Laurie A.
A

Rating
Back in March,
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
did an energy audit that yielded several issues. One was a major air leakage in the kitchen and downstairs Master bedroom. They came last week and cut open two large holes in the ceilings and sealed the entire area with rigid foam board and repaired the ceiling with new blueboard.
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
and his co-worker
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
did a fantastic job.
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
has a deep understanding of building science and his attention to detail is quite evident. Cutting open ceilings can be messy but they rigged up plastic tarps from floor to ceiling to minimize the spreading of any dust or debris. The clean up work was so good, you would not have known they had been there. They will be back in the fall to do air sealing in the attic. If you have any insulation related issues, I highly recommend you give them a call.
- Robert P.
F

Rating
I called a couple of times on different days to find out if they serve the area I live to get attic fan installed and asked the customer rep. but she said
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
is the only person who can answer that and transferred me to
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
but
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
is never there on both occasions. How is it that a customer representative of the company does not even know what part of town they service and where is
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
all the time?
- Mulugeta T.
A

Rating
The
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
team came out and blew 22 inches of new insulation into our attic. We had almost none of the original insulation or the last batch that had been done several years ago due to settling. They also sealed up any gaps they found along the outside facing walls and added a thermal
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
to attic door. They arrived on time and cleaned up after themselves when done. There was one issue where the insulation was sucked up out of our solar attic fan causing it to jam. The crew stayed and took the fan apart to clean it out and made sure it would not happen again. There was no "pressure" sales and they did not try to add on any un-needed services for additional cost. Very good experience.
- Scott M.
A

Rating
Great. Punctual, great price, incredible job. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Called just one other insulation installer, quotes didn't compare. Just can't believe another contractor could perform any better, no matter what the cost. don't look further, use
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
!!!
- Mike S.
A

Rating
After contacting
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
he came over to provide estimates quickly and was on time. He gave lots of helpful advice on the best approach for insulating a 115 year old house (interior vs exterior, priorities, cost effectiveness, etc). In the Spring 2014 we insulated the walls from the interior with blown in cellulose and had the basement perimeter sealed. The work proceeded well and there were no issues. Crew was great and with careful attention to detail. The proof of the effectiveness of the work was shown this winter with our gas bills being very reasonable. In
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
2015 we had
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
and crew return to insulate our family room which although it had some insulation when built 30 years ago the insulation was inadequate and the room is cold in the winter. This work also proceeded effciently and the work looks good. Looking forward to the improved warmth this winter. Overall, a great experience with
Veneta Insulation Contractors Provider Name Locked
's team. His experience and expertise was appreciated throughout the process.
- ANAND D.
D

Rating
We purchased a deal for $500 of blown insulation for $149. We were not aware that Adelphia will not just blow in $500 of insulation. They will only do a full attic insulation with a minimum of 6 inches of insulation. When your attic is over 1,200 square feet this turns the $149 deal into a lot larger price. The deal was clearly a "bait and switch". Now I must work with Angie's list to try to get the $149 back.
- Tony E C.

Insulation Contractors in Veneta, OR

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

AAA PLUS CONSTRUCTION LLC

70 CARTHAGE AVE
Eugene

ABB STOVES LLC

3800 River Road N #180
Keizer

American Home Shield

889 Ridge Lake Blvd

Arma Coatings

5555 West 11th Avenue
Eugene

CASTILE CONSTRUCTION INC

1919 W 15TH AVE
Eugene

Cloudcap Construction

2320 Adams St
Eugene

COLYER GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

92295 MARCOLA RD
Marcola

Cyber Bridge Marine, Inc.

209 S. Stephanie St

Dale's Remodeling

5514 Commercial St SE
Salem

Emerald Valley Weatherization Inc

148 14th St
Springfield

Eugene Custom Sash And Door

2345 Charnelton St
Eugene

Exterior Touch Inc.

12610 Waverly RD.

Giron Construction LLC

5633 SE 111th Ave
Portland,

Gresham Roofing and Construction

16921 Southeast Tristin Avenue
Happy Valley

High Performance Homes

4200 SE Columbia Way

Insul8

732 Shelly St.

J & S Construction & Investment

PO Box 1740
Springfield

John Webb Construction & Design

1256 Willagillespie RD
Eugene

John's Waterproofing

201 Airport Rd
Silverton

Josh Lowe's Dr Energy Saver

3922 W 1st St
Eugene

K & R Quality Construction LLC

85861 Bailey Hill Rd
Eugene

Kent R. Frey Construction

1574 Coburg Rd. #262
Eugene

Marshall's Inc

4110 Olympic St
Springfield

Matthew G Hunter

1330 Cleveland Hill Rd
Roseburg

Mike Timmermann

2720 Taylor St.
Eugene

Neil Kelly Design Build Remodeling

804 N Alberta St
Portland

Nicholls Home Restorations

32262 Goddard Ln
Cottage Grove

Paul Cottle Construction LLC

4420 NE 54th Ave
Portland

Premium Efficiency Inc

PO Box 11532
Eugene

ProSource Construction, LLC

665 Conger st
Eugene

RGC Construction

670 Argon Ave
Eugene

SERVICE MASTER ELITE

3904 W 1ST AVE
Eugene

Six Degrees Construction Co

980 Van Buren St
Eugene

Soundrite-Acoustics, Inc.

209 S. Stephanie Street

TerraFirma Foundation Systems

761 NE Garden Valley Blvd.
Roseburg

Timber Home Improvements, LLC

7500 NE 16th Avenue, Suite 1A

UNGER CONSTRUCTION LLC

1574 Coburg Rd. #213
Eugene

Warmzone

12637 S 265 W Suite 100

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