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Contractors say homeowners with this trait are the most satisfied with home improvement projects.

Signing a contract (Photo by Katie Jacewicz)
Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home

Don't get burned by failing to read the fine print of a home remodeling contract. Check out these things every remodeling contract should contain.

Angie's List
Drywall, Fencing, Fencing & Driveway Gates, Painting - Exterior, Painting - Interior, Plumbing, Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Kitchen & Bathroom, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home, Roofing

Houston roofing complaint | Contractor claims leaks are coming from plumbing, not roof.

Angie's List
Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home, Roofing
Homeowner claims property manager hired to oversee roofing work, drywall repair and electrical upgrades allowed contractors to do unsatisfactory and incomplete work.

Angie's Answers

?
Todd said it best.

An itemized list / cost breakdown, more often than not is used against the contractor when it is shared with other builders who will then beat it.

Good contractors use good people, and good people cost more.  Just the cost of having the appropriate insurance / bond can be the difference between winning a job or losing it ot a 'lower bid'.

It is the rule of three; there is Good, Cheap and Fast.  You can have any two:  Good and Cheap, won't be Fast; Good and Fast, won't be Cheap;  Cheap and Fast, won't be Good!

When comparing bids, it isn't the cheapest or the 'nicest' person you should select.   You should understand why there is a large price difference (it shows there are gaps in your design program or what you have asked for specifically, which means there may be arguments later).  If most of the bids are in line, and one is way high or way low,  you want to know why before dismissing or selecting them.

A price-only decision almost always costs more in the long run. 

Good luck!
?

No.  Heck no.  Here's a good example.  We very recently needed to find someone to install about 500 square feet of exotic wood flooring (we already have the materials).  We contacted about 12-15 top-rated Angieslist contractors.  Out of the few who did get back to us, we got 5 quotes, 2 of them were literally just over the phone.  They "didn't feel it would be necessary to even see the space". 

 

Here were the bids: 

$4000 (sight unseen), $2800 (sight unseen), $2500, $1500, $1450

 

We didn't "share our budget for this".  Why would we?  We asked them to bid the job.  That's it.  All of them should be well-qualified and they are all highly rated.  We were interested in how THEY value their time/resources - for an apples/apples job. 

 

Do you still think that you should tell them about your budget?  Your choice.  From my standpoint it isn't their business.  I'm asking them to bid on a project.  Invariably I'll get some very high bids, medium bids and a few more reasonable ones - ALL from "highly rated contractors". 

?

Herlonginc's answer stated that it is not the contractor's job to pay for materials and labor to do the job. I say baloney - a reputable, established contractor has the funds (or a business operations line of credit) to "carry" the job between interim or partial payments, each of which should be keyed to completion of distinct easily measured mileposts in the job, and for a homeowner I would say should be in not more than 20% increments for jobs exceeding a week or so. For shorter jobs, then an initial payment, 50% completion, and completion would be normal. His cost of carry funds is part of his cost of doing business, and is figured as part of his overhead.Bear in mind when he is buying materials and paying labor, his materials he typically pays for on a 10-30 day invoice, and his labor typically a week or two after they work, so he is not really "fronting" that much money if you are giving him weekly or biweekly interim payments, on a typical residential job.

If he does not have the funds to buy materials (excepting possibly deposit on special-order or luxury items, which still typically are 10-30 day invoiceable to him) and hire personnel then he is a fly-by-night operation, and he should not be bidding that size job. You should never (other than MAYBE an earnest deposit of not more than the LESSER of 10% or $5000) let the payments get ahead of the approved/inspected work progress - typically payment should be 10-20% BEHIND the progress, with at least 10% retained at the effective end of work until final inspections and completion of the final "punchlist".

That promotes rapid continuation of the work, discourages the all-too common nightmare of contractors taking on more work than they can handle so they leave your job for weeks or months to go work on someone else's job (frequently to start that someone else's new job so he can get the job), and does not leave you out a tremendous amount of cash if he does not finish and you have to hire another contractor to finish the job. Remember, if you have to hire a new contractor to finish the job, he will charge you a lot more than the original bid to finish someone else's unfinished mess.

This may seem cynical, but having started in the construction business about 50 years ago and seeing the shenanigans that a lot of contractors pull you cannot be too safe. You have to remember contractors are like any other people - I would say maybe 10% are outright crooks, another 25% or so will pull a fast one or overcharge if the opportunity presents itself, maybe 30% will do the work but not any better than they are forced to, about 25% are good conscientious reputable workmen, and the last 10% or so are really spectacular - conscientious, fair, and efficient craftsmen. This top 35% are the only ones you should have bidding in the first place. Therefore, only get bids from long-term reputable firms (so you shake out the marginal short-timers with less experience and also generally less ability to finish the job on budget and schedule), only those that have good RECENT references, and preferably with excellent word-of-mouth recommendation from people you know and trust. That way, you are starting right off with the cream of the crop, so hopefully whichever one bids low should be a good choice.

NEVER start with bids, then check the references of the low bidder - why even consider a vendor or contractor who you do not have faith in from the start ? Get references and short-list you possibles BEFORE you ask for bids.

Low bids - that is another matter - commonly the low bidder is NOT who you want, especially if he is significantly lower than several others, which might mean he is desperate for work, made a math error, or did not correctly figure the entire scope of work. You want a reasonable bid with someone you connect with and trust - that is worth a lot more in the success of the job than the absolute lowest bid.

 

?
You should always get a set of print and pull a permit when remodeling you home. It is a good thing that you want to be involved in your project. I do have some reservation about the electrical work. There is a lot at risk with doing the work yourself. If the house burns down you will never get the insurance money, unless your a certified electrician. Now of days 90% of home fires are blamed on electrical problems because the insurance company is to lazy and cheap to investigate the true problem. Also find out if the city you live in will allow you to perform the work. Make sure you coordinate your subs to have the proper time and space to perform their job. You don't want people working on top of each other. If you order all you materials make sure everything is there before you start your project. Have your subs check for proper and full items to be installed. Make sure every sub has a working set of prints. Make sure you have all the demo done before your subs show up to work. Schedule your plumber first, do any final framing or electrical work while you wait for inspection. Electrical inspection next followed by framing, insulation, and wallboard. All subs must get a final inspection on the job before you (the GC) can call in your final inspection.
?
The answer depends on your contract.  If you do not have a written contract, you need to begin documenting everything.  Begin by using a calendar and marking the days the contractor started, worked, you had to speak to him/her about the work, etc.

Next photograph the work you feel is sub-par.  If work has been corrected, photograph it now to have a record of its condition.  If you have any "original" or "before work began" pictures get those together, too.

If you do have written contract, see what it says about warranties, complaints, failure to finish / comply, etc.  Holding the money may end up with the contractor taking YOU to court for the funds - you cannot just hold the money.  You need to document in writing what is wrong, what you expect to happen (be specific) and when it should happen by.  A good contract will explain if and how money can be held, how the arbitration or complaint is filed, etc.

You should also invite another contractor to come in and bid the work to finish the job.  They can confirm the quality of the work and give you a price to fix / finish the job.  This gives you justification for holding the funds and an option to finish the job.

If the contractor is not willing to fix the work or listen to direction, do not allow them back in the house.  A judge will ask you why you let them continue to do work if you found it unacceptable.  Take back the key or access to the building - you can also attempt holding any materials or tools as collateral if the cost of repair is higher than the amount owed.  Again, document what you are holding, its estimated value (google or ebay search), etc.

Finally, in writing you should fire the contractor and state the exact reason(s).  Document everything; if it is done in person after they leave make notes of what was said, agreed upon and disputed.  If you are satisfied that what you have paid is fair compensation for the work done, make sure this is noted in the letter firing the contractor.  If you feel money is owed, you will need to file a small claim in your local court.  Include the documentation you made, notes, letters, etc. when you file your claim so the judge will have a copy of everything.  Don't forget to contact the BBB.

Do not wait for the court date; go ahead and hire the other contractor and have the work completed.  Bring this invoice to court with you (file it before the court date if you can).  Bring photos of the finished work (again, file it with the court before the date if possible).  You must show what good quality work looks like vs the poor quality work.

Otherwise it will be a your word against the contractor and you will most likely lose, (the contract is a promise to pay for work) or even if you "win" you will most likely split the difference between the argued amount of money.  Also be prepared for the contractor to file a small court claim against you.  Same process as above, except now you will respond to the summons with a copy of your stuff to defend your reason for holding funds instead of asking for money back.

Good luck!
?
Yes, you can ask for these items.  Second Century Homes answered your question well - most contractors do not do a break down to prevent haggling on items that shouldn't be part of the discussion.  People sometimes forget to allow the builder to make money. . .  Builders also want the entire job, not the nickle and dime menu selected items - you may find the contractor says "Thanks, but no thanks" if you ask them to remove portions of the work.

The real question is why do you need this break down?  If you are thinking you will do the demo yourself to save money, you can certainly tell your contractor this - but I would be willing to bet once you buy or rent the tools, haul the trash to the correct disposal dump (many trash dumps will not take home building materials anymore) and clean up / prep for the new work - you will have spent more and delayed the project more than just letting the professionals do it. Plus, do not be surprised when they still have to do additional demo work that you didn't know would be needed to complete the job, etc.

Also keep in mind that cutting portions of the work out of the job to do later is not a money saving move.  You will find that the cost for the individual items go up when done seperately - the contractor has to come back multiple times, has to set the equipment back up, possibly pull seperate permits, schedule the work crew / subs, etc.

If you are asking for the break down to compare bids, then again, tell the contractors what numbers you want to see.  If you are doing it because you feel the total price is too high, have a discussion with your contractor; they may be able to suggest ways to save costs, etc.  Ultimately if you know the materail costs, and have the total figure, you can do a pretty good estimate of the percentage for labor and profit in the job.

It is your project and your contract, so you can ask for anything you want on the quote - just be clear on why you want the information so the contractor can work with you.

Good luck!

All Modular Home Remodeling Companies in Coatesville, IN

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

A & C Cleaning

2826 S Lockburn St
Indianapolis

A-Good Handyman Service

3650 S New Jersey St
Indianapolis

A1 Hoosier Painting and More

419 W Pike St
Martinsville

Ace Custom Flooring

6008 N Oakland Ave
Indianapolis

B & A Home Remodeling LLC

5639 Woodside dr
Indianapolis

Barrett Bryan Builders

1224 8th St.
Columbus

Bergfield Home Solutions LLC

3032 Hawthorn Dr
Lapel

Better Construction & Renovation

1840 N Livingston Ave
Indianapolis

Better Homes General Contracting

938 N. Fenton Ave.
Indianapolis

Billman Interior Remodeling

6907 Stein Rd
Greenwood

Breaking the Law Landscaping

244 N. Old S.R. 67 South
Martinsville

Brown Remodeling

226 W. Madison St.
Franklin

Bulldog Home Remodeling and Repair

1308 E Ohio St
Indianapolis

C&C Total Construction

20608 Lamong Rd
Sheridan

C.A Lynch Associates llc

P.O Box 29148
Indianapolis

Cadtek Designs, Inc.

4728 N 400 West
Fairland

CALIBER CONSTRUCTION

10775 N BETHEL RD
Mooresville

CARPENTERS CONSTRUCTION INC

10156 N CARVER DR E
Mooresville

Carver Construction Company

7234 pheasant ridge drive

CD's Unique Builders

2314 N. Auburn St
Indianapolis

CLEARview Professional Window Cleaning

6440 Saint Joe Dr.
Indianapolis

Closet Connection

5619 Edgewood Trace Blvd
Indianapolis

Collins Carpentry

347 Andscott Dr
Brownsburg

D&D Handyman Services

3401 N Wittfield St
Indianapolis

Dan's Handi Work

12026 Broadway St
Indianapolis

David Hazen Group LLC

4861 West 106th Street
Zionsville

DC Contracting

604 East Mill St
Summitville

DC Roofing & Exteriors

596 Metairie Dr.
Greenwood

DirectBuy of Indianapolis

8450 Westfield Blvd
Indianapolis

Elmtex

Carmel

ENGLAND'S ELECTROSTATIC PAINTING

8107A E. 30th St.
Indianapolis

Express Restorations, Inc

830 W Banta Rd
Indianapolis

Extreme Property Solutions

8751 Rockville Rd
Indianapolis

Falls City Roofing

4332 Country View Dr.
Floyds Knobs

First Due Company

116 N. Grant St
Brownsburg

Floor Crafters Inc

12345 Old Meridian
Carmel

FREY CONSTRUCTION, INC

PO Box 185
New Palestine

haley construction

13144 Conner Knoll Pkwy
Fishers

Hamilton Construction and Remodeling LLC

41 Pine Dr. Apt 8
Martinsville

Hancock Home Improvement

523 west 600 north
Alexandria

Handy Repair Guys, LLC

1389 W. 86th Street
Indianapolis

Handyman Connection

5610 Crawfordsville Rd
Indianapolis

HD Contracting

1739 N 600 W
Greenfield

Home-Aid Residential, LLC

P.O. Box 68095
Indianapolis

HOMETOWN CONSTRUCTION & REMODEL INC.

201 Jefferson Blvd
Greenfield

HOOSIER CARPENTER

318 N VINE ST
Plainfield

Indiana Professional Contractors LLC

2031 Silver Ln Dr
Indianapolis

Indy Contractors Inc

1221 N Madison
Greenwood

Indy Home Detailers

Indianapolis

Indy Tile and Stoneworx

1299 Grant St.
Noblesville

Jason Schwedler Construction LLC

PO Box 20087
Indianapolis

Jorge's Handyman Services

4707 Brookville Rd

Kent Shaffer Builders Inc

8649 E 250 S
Zionsville

keybank

6067 polonius court

King Kong Roofing

218 n. Jefferson st.
Brownsburg

Klean Restoration, Inc

2176 N Meridian St
Indianapolis

Kodiak Construction

Bunkerhill rd
Mooresville

Laura's Designs

405 East Mission Street

Legacy Window & Door LLC

136 E Main St
Westfield

M.E.K.A. Services

13259 N. Forest Dr
Camby

Mager Enterprises, LLC

612 Main St.
Beech Grove

McGinn Construction & Remodeling

6149 Navy Cir
Indianapolis

Modern Maintenance and Renovations LLC

5326 Norwaldo Ave
Indianapolis

Monarch Destinations LLC

8310 Allison Point Blvd
Indianapolis

No Limit Contracting

2008 South Elizabeth Street
Kokomo

One Source Construction

230 Anderson ST
Clinton

Outer Limits Construction LLC

7703 W Shelby 250 S
Franklin

P B J Construction & Handyman Services, L L C

12096 Sail Place Drive
Indianapolis

PMK Services Inc.

972 E Pleasant Run Pkwy N Dr
Indianapolis

Reliable Seamless Guttering

9430 N Karen Dr
Mooresville

Respectable Restoration LLC.

3830 N State Rd 267 Suite B
Brownsburg

Rick's Roofing & Construction

1415 South 19th Street
New Castle

Rockstar's Home Improvement

3550 n hawthorne ln.

Ron's 24 Hr Mobile Mechanic Service

5151 Elmwood Ave
Indianapolis

RUSH CONSTRUCTION

5958 STINEMYER RD
New Palestine

SB10 Contracting LLC.

3356 Voigt Dr.
Carmel

Sebastian Construction

16514 Highway 10 N

Shaevitz Constrction

3410 Winings Ave
Indianapolis

Skaggs Construction, LLC

139 S Boehning St
Indianapolis

SUNCO CONSTRUCTION CO

319 Harlan Dr
Mooresville

Sure Seal Restorations

223 W Dodds St.
Bloomington

TAG Exteriors

6407 S. East St.
Indianapolis

TC Real Estate Services

910A N Green St
Brownsburg

The Heritage Handyman

208 Jefferson Valley
Coatesville

The Home Engineering Group

1652 Dr. Andrew J. Brown Avenue
Indianapolis

Vincent Decorating LLC

1572 Rolling Ridge Rd
Shelbyville

Waltman Construction Co., LLC

PO Box 1951
Nashville

Wesley Design & Contracting

82 Virgil Court
Greenwood

West construction inc

7650 Santa Barbara Dr

Wolff Construction Service

PO Box 5014
Zionsville

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