Jacksonville Beach Modular Home Remodeling Companies

in Jacksonville Beach, FL

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Contractors say homeowners with this trait are the most satisfied with home improvement projects.

Signing a contract (Photo by Katie Jacewicz)
Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home

Don't get burned by failing to read the fine print of a home remodeling contract. Check out these things every remodeling contract should contain.

Angie's List
Drywall, Fencing, Fencing & Driveway Gates, Painting - Exterior, Painting - Interior, Plumbing, Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Kitchen & Bathroom, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home, Roofing

Houston roofing complaint | Contractor claims leaks are coming from plumbing, not roof.

Angie's List
Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Modular & Mobile Home, Roofing
Homeowner claims property manager hired to oversee roofing work, drywall repair and electrical upgrades allowed contractors to do unsatisfactory and incomplete work.

Angie's Answers

?
Todd said it best.

An itemized list / cost breakdown, more often than not is used against the contractor when it is shared with other builders who will then beat it.

Good contractors use good people, and good people cost more.  Just the cost of having the appropriate insurance / bond can be the difference between winning a job or losing it ot a 'lower bid'.

It is the rule of three; there is Good, Cheap and Fast.  You can have any two:  Good and Cheap, won't be Fast; Good and Fast, won't be Cheap;  Cheap and Fast, won't be Good!

When comparing bids, it isn't the cheapest or the 'nicest' person you should select.   You should understand why there is a large price difference (it shows there are gaps in your design program or what you have asked for specifically, which means there may be arguments later).  If most of the bids are in line, and one is way high or way low,  you want to know why before dismissing or selecting them.

A price-only decision almost always costs more in the long run. 

Good luck!
?
There are two sides to this and everyone will have an opinion.  I can tell you that from a contractor's point of view a customer that is up front with me is much easier to work with and the entire experience is much more pleasurable to all parties involved.  If you treat your contractor like there's always something to hide from him expect the same in return.  A good contractor is going to take your budget into consideration and make recommendations based on that budget.  When possible, he's going to estimate the work 10-20% under your target to leave room for the unexpected.  With any remodeling work, there's always the possibility and likelihood that there will be surprises that will have to be added such as mold damage, improper existing framing, etc.  The cushion allows room for the project cost to grow without going over your budget.  If no problems are found and you decide to spend that money some of the final finishes can be upgraded or other projects added.

Another good arguement for disclosing your budget to your contractor is to save you both some time and aggrevation.  You may have a $10,000 budget and want $30,000 worth of work.  Wouldn't you like to know your desires aren't possible before you get your hopes up or spend money on design fees for plans you can't afford?  Likewise, the contractor doesn't want to put in the hours of calculating the estimate only to find out it was all for nothing or that he has to refigure for a much lower cost after pricing what you specified.

Be fair and honest with your contractor if you expect the same respect in return.  You'll get a lot more out of it with the right contractor.

Todd Shell
Todd's Home Services
San Antonio, TX
?

Herlonginc's answer stated that it is not the contractor's job to pay for materials and labor to do the job. I say baloney - a reputable, established contractor has the funds (or a business operations line of credit) to "carry" the job between interim or partial payments, each of which should be keyed to completion of distinct easily measured mileposts in the job, and for a homeowner I would say should be in not more than 20% increments for jobs exceeding a week or so. For shorter jobs, then an initial payment, 50% completion, and completion would be normal. His cost of carry funds is part of his cost of doing business, and is figured as part of his overhead.Bear in mind when he is buying materials and paying labor, his materials he typically pays for on a 10-30 day invoice, and his labor typically a week or two after they work, so he is not really "fronting" that much money if you are giving him weekly or biweekly interim payments, on a typical residential job.

If he does not have the funds to buy materials (excepting possibly deposit on special-order or luxury items, which still typically are 10-30 day invoiceable to him) and hire personnel then he is a fly-by-night operation, and he should not be bidding that size job. You should never (other than MAYBE an earnest deposit of not more than the LESSER of 10% or $5000) let the payments get ahead of the approved/inspected work progress - typically payment should be 10-20% BEHIND the progress, with at least 10% retained at the effective end of work until final inspections and completion of the final "punchlist".

That promotes rapid continuation of the work, discourages the all-too common nightmare of contractors taking on more work than they can handle so they leave your job for weeks or months to go work on someone else's job (frequently to start that someone else's new job so he can get the job), and does not leave you out a tremendous amount of cash if he does not finish and you have to hire another contractor to finish the job. Remember, if you have to hire a new contractor to finish the job, he will charge you a lot more than the original bid to finish someone else's unfinished mess.

This may seem cynical, but having started in the construction business about 50 years ago and seeing the shenanigans that a lot of contractors pull you cannot be too safe. You have to remember contractors are like any other people - I would say maybe 10% are outright crooks, another 25% or so will pull a fast one or overcharge if the opportunity presents itself, maybe 30% will do the work but not any better than they are forced to, about 25% are good conscientious reputable workmen, and the last 10% or so are really spectacular - conscientious, fair, and efficient craftsmen. This top 35% are the only ones you should have bidding in the first place. Therefore, only get bids from long-term reputable firms (so you shake out the marginal short-timers with less experience and also generally less ability to finish the job on budget and schedule), only those that have good RECENT references, and preferably with excellent word-of-mouth recommendation from people you know and trust. That way, you are starting right off with the cream of the crop, so hopefully whichever one bids low should be a good choice.

NEVER start with bids, then check the references of the low bidder - why even consider a vendor or contractor who you do not have faith in from the start ? Get references and short-list you possibles BEFORE you ask for bids.

Low bids - that is another matter - commonly the low bidder is NOT who you want, especially if he is significantly lower than several others, which might mean he is desperate for work, made a math error, or did not correctly figure the entire scope of work. You want a reasonable bid with someone you connect with and trust - that is worth a lot more in the success of the job than the absolute lowest bid.

 

?
You should always get a set of print and pull a permit when remodeling you home. It is a good thing that you want to be involved in your project. I do have some reservation about the electrical work. There is a lot at risk with doing the work yourself. If the house burns down you will never get the insurance money, unless your a certified electrician. Now of days 90% of home fires are blamed on electrical problems because the insurance company is to lazy and cheap to investigate the true problem. Also find out if the city you live in will allow you to perform the work. Make sure you coordinate your subs to have the proper time and space to perform their job. You don't want people working on top of each other. If you order all you materials make sure everything is there before you start your project. Have your subs check for proper and full items to be installed. Make sure every sub has a working set of prints. Make sure you have all the demo done before your subs show up to work. Schedule your plumber first, do any final framing or electrical work while you wait for inspection. Electrical inspection next followed by framing, insulation, and wallboard. All subs must get a final inspection on the job before you (the GC) can call in your final inspection.
?
The answer depends on your contract.  If you do not have a written contract, you need to begin documenting everything.  Begin by using a calendar and marking the days the contractor started, worked, you had to speak to him/her about the work, etc.

Next photograph the work you feel is sub-par.  If work has been corrected, photograph it now to have a record of its condition.  If you have any "original" or "before work began" pictures get those together, too.

If you do have written contract, see what it says about warranties, complaints, failure to finish / comply, etc.  Holding the money may end up with the contractor taking YOU to court for the funds - you cannot just hold the money.  You need to document in writing what is wrong, what you expect to happen (be specific) and when it should happen by.  A good contract will explain if and how money can be held, how the arbitration or complaint is filed, etc.

You should also invite another contractor to come in and bid the work to finish the job.  They can confirm the quality of the work and give you a price to fix / finish the job.  This gives you justification for holding the funds and an option to finish the job.

If the contractor is not willing to fix the work or listen to direction, do not allow them back in the house.  A judge will ask you why you let them continue to do work if you found it unacceptable.  Take back the key or access to the building - you can also attempt holding any materials or tools as collateral if the cost of repair is higher than the amount owed.  Again, document what you are holding, its estimated value (google or ebay search), etc.

Finally, in writing you should fire the contractor and state the exact reason(s).  Document everything; if it is done in person after they leave make notes of what was said, agreed upon and disputed.  If you are satisfied that what you have paid is fair compensation for the work done, make sure this is noted in the letter firing the contractor.  If you feel money is owed, you will need to file a small claim in your local court.  Include the documentation you made, notes, letters, etc. when you file your claim so the judge will have a copy of everything.  Don't forget to contact the BBB.

Do not wait for the court date; go ahead and hire the other contractor and have the work completed.  Bring this invoice to court with you (file it before the court date if you can).  Bring photos of the finished work (again, file it with the court before the date if possible).  You must show what good quality work looks like vs the poor quality work.

Otherwise it will be a your word against the contractor and you will most likely lose, (the contract is a promise to pay for work) or even if you "win" you will most likely split the difference between the argued amount of money.  Also be prepared for the contractor to file a small court claim against you.  Same process as above, except now you will respond to the summons with a copy of your stuff to defend your reason for holding funds instead of asking for money back.

Good luck!
?
Yes, you can ask for these items.  Second Century Homes answered your question well - most contractors do not do a break down to prevent haggling on items that shouldn't be part of the discussion.  People sometimes forget to allow the builder to make money. . .  Builders also want the entire job, not the nickle and dime menu selected items - you may find the contractor says "Thanks, but no thanks" if you ask them to remove portions of the work.

The real question is why do you need this break down?  If you are thinking you will do the demo yourself to save money, you can certainly tell your contractor this - but I would be willing to bet once you buy or rent the tools, haul the trash to the correct disposal dump (many trash dumps will not take home building materials anymore) and clean up / prep for the new work - you will have spent more and delayed the project more than just letting the professionals do it. Plus, do not be surprised when they still have to do additional demo work that you didn't know would be needed to complete the job, etc.

Also keep in mind that cutting portions of the work out of the job to do later is not a money saving move.  You will find that the cost for the individual items go up when done seperately - the contractor has to come back multiple times, has to set the equipment back up, possibly pull seperate permits, schedule the work crew / subs, etc.

If you are asking for the break down to compare bids, then again, tell the contractors what numbers you want to see.  If you are doing it because you feel the total price is too high, have a discussion with your contractor; they may be able to suggest ways to save costs, etc.  Ultimately if you know the materail costs, and have the total figure, you can do a pretty good estimate of the percentage for labor and profit in the job.

It is your project and your contract, so you can ask for anything you want on the quote - just be clear on why you want the information so the contractor can work with you.

Good luck!

All Modular Home Remodeling Companies in Jacksonville Beach, FL

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

4-D Tile and Home Improvement

56082 Davis Rd
Callahan

A to Z Services LLC

12805 Old Field Landing Dr
Jacksonville

A+ Plus Trim and Painting

1645 Forest Hills Rd
Jacksonville

A1 Remodeling / Ronnie Hall

7781 Ford Rd
Bryceville

ADDITIONAL LIVING INC

14286-19 Beach Blvd
Jacksonville

Akma General Contractors

8237 halls hammock ct
Jacksonville

All American Debris & Wrecking, LLC

4118 Cransley Pl
Jacksonville

American Coastal Builders, LLC

1333 Blackmon Rd
Green Cove Springs

ASAP Plumbing

PO Box 48070
Jacksonville

ATLANTIC COAST ROOFING & CONSTRUCTION

5909 ST AUGUSTINE RD
Jacksonville

BETTER BUILT HOMES

1800 State Road 207
Saint Augustine

BMI Painting & Construction Services

3609 Fort Peyton Cir
Saint Augustine

Burbank Maintenance

11255 Guinn Rd
Jacksonville

Capstone Roofing Inc.

5331 Commercial Way
Spring Hill

CCI CLEANING & RESTORATION

1750 EMERSON ST
Jacksonville

CHRISTIAN CRAFTERS INTERNATIONAL

4606 MONUMENT POINT DR
Jacksonville

COASTAL ATLANTIC, INC.

1639 BEACH BLVD #102
Jacksonville Beach

Coastal Properties Handyman Services LLC

97125 Pirates Point Rd
Yulee

Conrad Construction Inc

PO Box 470424
Debary

Cowboy's East Coast Contruction Inc

10990 Fort Caroline Rd #350089
Jacksonville

CROWN POOLS, INC

3002 PHILLIPS HWY
Jacksonville

CS Handyman Services Group, LLC

2806 Paces Ferry Road West
Orange Park

Cupecoy Construction, Inc.

5028 Rue Street
Jacksonville

DC Davis Construction

PO Box 348
Callahan

DirectBuy of Indianapolis

8450 Westfield Blvd

distinctive home remodeling

695 A1A N
Ponte Vedra Beach

Donald & Ronald's Universal Home Repair

Aries Rd. west
Jacksonville

Elite Construction of Jax, Inc.

254 Talleyrand Avenue
Jacksonville

Eric Norman Repairs

5519 Amazon Ave
Jacksonville

Everetts Custom Renovations LLC

65071 Lagoon Forest Dr
Yulee

Extreme Improvements

4810 Timothy St
Middleburg

Fast Track Builders

4342 Key Largo Dr
Jacksonville

Fidus Roofing & Construction LLC

301 Kingsley Lake Dr.
Saint Augustine

First Choice Electric Inc

716 Valley Forge Rd N
Neptune Beach

Golden Hammer Restoration and Roofing Inc.

4422 Manchester Rd.
Jacksonville

Greene's Painting, Inc.

P.O. Box 2310
Middleburg

Hamilton Building and Remodeling

2246 Hidden Waters Dr W
Green Cove Springs

Hampton Builders

2901 Plum Orchard Dr
Orange Park

handyman2hire

3324 W University Ave
Gainesville

Incore Builders Corp

12567 Sweetwater Ln
Jacksonville

Intact Construction Management Group

12920 Rocky River Rd. N,

J&D Commercial Services Inc.

609 Catherine Foster Ln
Saint Johns

Jacksonville Home Repair & Remodeling

11284 Southington Pl
Jacksonville

JEM ELECTRICAL INC

7219 Capercaillie Trail
Jacksonville

JIM'S PAINTING & DECORATING

2386 GLEN GARDNER DR
Jacksonville

JM Mobile Service

78 Azalea Ave
Middleburg

Lancey Construction Inc.

305 Edson Dr
Orange Park

Lee & Cates Glass

1651 S Eighth St
Fernandina Beach

LEE & CATES GLASS INC

1415 KINGSLEY AVE
Orange Park

Lord General Contractors Corporation

Post Office Box 99
Indian Rocks Beach

Maldonado Construction Services Inc.

11529 Maclay Ct
Jacksonville

Martinson Handyman Service

266 Southern Rose Dr.
Jacksonville

Mathieu Builders

1187 23rd St N
Jacksonville Beach

McNeal & White Contractors Inc

1857 Wells Rd
Orange Park

Nesmith Construction LLC

324 W 17th St
Jacksonville

On Point Carpentry, LLC

7573 Glenn Abbey Pl.
Jacksonville

P & M of North Florida Inc

5520 Jackson Ave
Orange Park

Parallel Construction Company

4446 Hendricks Avenue
Jacksonville

Parrish Tile & Remodeling

1886 Mcguire Way
Hilliard

Porcelite of Daytona

1 S Beach St
Ormond Beach

Powers Services and Repairs, Inc.

1118 Legay Ave.
Jacksonville

Preferred Maintenance

11111-70 San Jose Blvd
Jacksonville

Sandusky, Inc.

4710 Water Oak Lane
Jacksonville

See It N 3D Design & Technical Illustrations

500 Los Faroles , Carr 861
Miami

Sharpen Jax

Jacksonville

simmons home improvement, inc

p.o. box 7461
Jacksonville

SSS CONSTRUCTION INC

9960 WATERMARK LANE WEST
Jacksonville

STEHL HOME IMPROVEMENTS, INC

P.O. Box 312
Ponte Vedra Beach

Sumner Development

3814 Park St #1

Superior Building

11497 W Columbia Park Dr
Jacksonville

The Handyman Company

6900 Phillips Highway
Jacksonville

Tier 1 Construction

13245 Atlantic Blvd
Jacksonville

Tile Specialist

520 Methvin Rd

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONS INC

1141 Hideaway Dr N
Saint Johns

TOWN & COUNTRY HOMES

1 ENTERPRISE DR
Bunnell

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