Fort Payne Lumber Stores

in Fort Payne, AL

25
Lumber Stores are
in Fort Payne

5
Lumber Stores in Fort Payne
are top rated

F
Rated by
Barbara H.
"I called Masonite Door, and they were angry that I did not use Home Depot’s installers to install the door. He was trying to tell me that the door was improperly installed. Not" only did they not want to do the repairs, they wanted to void the lifetime warranty after we spent $2300 on the door. Home Depot came out and fixed it but it was still a little warped. Now, it is even worse. I have filed a claim against Masonite, and they denied the claim. I would recommend that people use caution when buying a door from them. Their customer service is very poor and they will blame the customer when anything is wrong. This is no way to treat a customer who spent $2300 on a door and leaving me with no warranty and a warped door.
A
Rated by
bonnie B.
"We are very pleased. Only took the two of them 2 days from start to finish. Took all the old windows with them and cleaned up the mess, even washed the windows when they were done!" We went with them because their bid for the labor was the lowest and liked the owners professionalism. They even had to cut an inch or so off the height for the sliders to get them to fit. I was a bit worried about that since the outside of our house is stucco, but can't tell in the finished look.
A
Rated by
Darlene L.
"
shop locally in Rockledge
. Staff in store is always helpful and will actually walk you across store to item you need even if its not" the dept they are working it! I recently bought a refrigerator from the location and had it delivered. The gentlemen who delivered it were on time and were a pleasure to deal with and made sure all was well with delivery taking off all the plastic to the product and let me tell you, there was a lot!

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Angie's Answers

?
Todd said it best.

An itemized list / cost breakdown, more often than not is used against the contractor when it is shared with other builders who will then beat it.

Good contractors use good people, and good people cost more.  Just the cost of having the appropriate insurance / bond can be the difference between winning a job or losing it ot a 'lower bid'.

It is the rule of three; there is Good, Cheap and Fast.  You can have any two:  Good and Cheap, won't be Fast; Good and Fast, won't be Cheap;  Cheap and Fast, won't be Good!

When comparing bids, it isn't the cheapest or the 'nicest' person you should select.   You should understand why there is a large price difference (it shows there are gaps in your design program or what you have asked for specifically, which means there may be arguments later).  If most of the bids are in line, and one is way high or way low,  you want to know why before dismissing or selecting them.

A price-only decision almost always costs more in the long run. 

Good luck!
?
There are two sides to this and everyone will have an opinion.  I can tell you that from a contractor's point of view a customer that is up front with me is much easier to work with and the entire experience is much more pleasurable to all parties involved.  If you treat your contractor like there's always something to hide from him expect the same in return.  A good contractor is going to take your budget into consideration and make recommendations based on that budget.  When possible, he's going to estimate the work 10-20% under your target to leave room for the unexpected.  With any remodeling work, there's always the possibility and likelihood that there will be surprises that will have to be added such as mold damage, improper existing framing, etc.  The cushion allows room for the project cost to grow without going over your budget.  If no problems are found and you decide to spend that money some of the final finishes can be upgraded or other projects added.

Another good arguement for disclosing your budget to your contractor is to save you both some time and aggrevation.  You may have a $10,000 budget and want $30,000 worth of work.  Wouldn't you like to know your desires aren't possible before you get your hopes up or spend money on design fees for plans you can't afford?  Likewise, the contractor doesn't want to put in the hours of calculating the estimate only to find out it was all for nothing or that he has to refigure for a much lower cost after pricing what you specified.

Be fair and honest with your contractor if you expect the same respect in return.  You'll get a lot more out of it with the right contractor.

Todd Shell
Todd's Home Services
San Antonio, TX
?

Herlonginc's answer stated that it is not the contractor's job to pay for materials and labor to do the job. I say baloney - a reputable, established contractor has the funds (or a business operations line of credit) to "carry" the job between interim or partial payments, each of which should be keyed to completion of distinct easily measured mileposts in the job, and for a homeowner I would say should be in not more than 20% increments for jobs exceeding a week or so. For shorter jobs, then an initial payment, 50% completion, and completion would be normal. His cost of carry funds is part of his cost of doing business, and is figured as part of his overhead.Bear in mind when he is buying materials and paying labor, his materials he typically pays for on a 10-30 day invoice, and his labor typically a week or two after they work, so he is not really "fronting" that much money if you are giving him weekly or biweekly interim payments, on a typical residential job.

If he does not have the funds to buy materials (excepting possibly deposit on special-order or luxury items, which still typically are 10-30 day invoiceable to him) and hire personnel then he is a fly-by-night operation, and he should not be bidding that size job. You should never (other than MAYBE an earnest deposit of not more than the LESSER of 10% or $5000) let the payments get ahead of the approved/inspected work progress - typically payment should be 10-20% BEHIND the progress, with at least 10% retained at the effective end of work until final inspections and completion of the final "punchlist".

That promotes rapid continuation of the work, discourages the all-too common nightmare of contractors taking on more work than they can handle so they leave your job for weeks or months to go work on someone else's job (frequently to start that someone else's new job so he can get the job), and does not leave you out a tremendous amount of cash if he does not finish and you have to hire another contractor to finish the job. Remember, if you have to hire a new contractor to finish the job, he will charge you a lot more than the original bid to finish someone else's unfinished mess.

This may seem cynical, but having started in the construction business about 50 years ago and seeing the shenanigans that a lot of contractors pull you cannot be too safe. You have to remember contractors are like any other people - I would say maybe 10% are outright crooks, another 25% or so will pull a fast one or overcharge if the opportunity presents itself, maybe 30% will do the work but not any better than they are forced to, about 25% are good conscientious reputable workmen, and the last 10% or so are really spectacular - conscientious, fair, and efficient craftsmen. This top 35% are the only ones you should have bidding in the first place. Therefore, only get bids from long-term reputable firms (so you shake out the marginal short-timers with less experience and also generally less ability to finish the job on budget and schedule), only those that have good RECENT references, and preferably with excellent word-of-mouth recommendation from people you know and trust. That way, you are starting right off with the cream of the crop, so hopefully whichever one bids low should be a good choice.

NEVER start with bids, then check the references of the low bidder - why even consider a vendor or contractor who you do not have faith in from the start ? Get references and short-list you possibles BEFORE you ask for bids.

Low bids - that is another matter - commonly the low bidder is NOT who you want, especially if he is significantly lower than several others, which might mean he is desperate for work, made a math error, or did not correctly figure the entire scope of work. You want a reasonable bid with someone you connect with and trust - that is worth a lot more in the success of the job than the absolute lowest bid.

 

?
You should always get a set of print and pull a permit when remodeling you home. It is a good thing that you want to be involved in your project. I do have some reservation about the electrical work. There is a lot at risk with doing the work yourself. If the house burns down you will never get the insurance money, unless your a certified electrician. Now of days 90% of home fires are blamed on electrical problems because the insurance company is to lazy and cheap to investigate the true problem. Also find out if the city you live in will allow you to perform the work. Make sure you coordinate your subs to have the proper time and space to perform their job. You don't want people working on top of each other. If you order all you materials make sure everything is there before you start your project. Have your subs check for proper and full items to be installed. Make sure every sub has a working set of prints. Make sure you have all the demo done before your subs show up to work. Schedule your plumber first, do any final framing or electrical work while you wait for inspection. Electrical inspection next followed by framing, insulation, and wallboard. All subs must get a final inspection on the job before you (the GC) can call in your final inspection.
?
The answer depends on your contract.  If you do not have a written contract, you need to begin documenting everything.  Begin by using a calendar and marking the days the contractor started, worked, you had to speak to him/her about the work, etc.

Next photograph the work you feel is sub-par.  If work has been corrected, photograph it now to have a record of its condition.  If you have any "original" or "before work began" pictures get those together, too.

If you do have written contract, see what it says about warranties, complaints, failure to finish / comply, etc.  Holding the money may end up with the contractor taking YOU to court for the funds - you cannot just hold the money.  You need to document in writing what is wrong, what you expect to happen (be specific) and when it should happen by.  A good contract will explain if and how money can be held, how the arbitration or complaint is filed, etc.

You should also invite another contractor to come in and bid the work to finish the job.  They can confirm the quality of the work and give you a price to fix / finish the job.  This gives you justification for holding the funds and an option to finish the job.

If the contractor is not willing to fix the work or listen to direction, do not allow them back in the house.  A judge will ask you why you let them continue to do work if you found it unacceptable.  Take back the key or access to the building - you can also attempt holding any materials or tools as collateral if the cost of repair is higher than the amount owed.  Again, document what you are holding, its estimated value (google or ebay search), etc.

Finally, in writing you should fire the contractor and state the exact reason(s).  Document everything; if it is done in person after they leave make notes of what was said, agreed upon and disputed.  If you are satisfied that what you have paid is fair compensation for the work done, make sure this is noted in the letter firing the contractor.  If you feel money is owed, you will need to file a small claim in your local court.  Include the documentation you made, notes, letters, etc. when you file your claim so the judge will have a copy of everything.  Don't forget to contact the BBB.

Do not wait for the court date; go ahead and hire the other contractor and have the work completed.  Bring this invoice to court with you (file it before the court date if you can).  Bring photos of the finished work (again, file it with the court before the date if possible).  You must show what good quality work looks like vs the poor quality work.

Otherwise it will be a your word against the contractor and you will most likely lose, (the contract is a promise to pay for work) or even if you "win" you will most likely split the difference between the argued amount of money.  Also be prepared for the contractor to file a small court claim against you.  Same process as above, except now you will respond to the summons with a copy of your stuff to defend your reason for holding funds instead of asking for money back.

Good luck!
?
Yes, you can ask for these items.  Second Century Homes answered your question well - most contractors do not do a break down to prevent haggling on items that shouldn't be part of the discussion.  People sometimes forget to allow the builder to make money. . .  Builders also want the entire job, not the nickle and dime menu selected items - you may find the contractor says "Thanks, but no thanks" if you ask them to remove portions of the work.

The real question is why do you need this break down?  If you are thinking you will do the demo yourself to save money, you can certainly tell your contractor this - but I would be willing to bet once you buy or rent the tools, haul the trash to the correct disposal dump (many trash dumps will not take home building materials anymore) and clean up / prep for the new work - you will have spent more and delayed the project more than just letting the professionals do it. Plus, do not be surprised when they still have to do additional demo work that you didn't know would be needed to complete the job, etc.

Also keep in mind that cutting portions of the work out of the job to do later is not a money saving move.  You will find that the cost for the individual items go up when done seperately - the contractor has to come back multiple times, has to set the equipment back up, possibly pull seperate permits, schedule the work crew / subs, etc.

If you are asking for the break down to compare bids, then again, tell the contractors what numbers you want to see.  If you are doing it because you feel the total price is too high, have a discussion with your contractor; they may be able to suggest ways to save costs, etc.  Ultimately if you know the materail costs, and have the total figure, you can do a pretty good estimate of the percentage for labor and profit in the job.

It is your project and your contract, so you can ask for anything you want on the quote - just be clear on why you want the information so the contractor can work with you.

Good luck!

Home Improvement Store reviews in Fort Payne

A

Rating
The items were very inexpensive (think
Fort Payne Lumber Stores Provider Name Locked
store for building materials complete with automatic markdowns) and of very good quality. For example, we purchased several Hudson Valley wall sconces for ~$50 each (compared to ~$250 retail). However, the selection is limited so you have to go in with an open mind.
- Nina P.
F

Rating
Purchased an automatic toilet seat online on 10/21/2014. Had not heard from the purchase after initial confirmation of purchase so I called them. I was on hold for OVER 30 minutes. When they finally answered they told me they ddn't carry my item even though it was shown on their website and they had sent me an order confirmation. They were not apologetic for never contacting me to let me know my order was cancelled. I could have waited for weeks before figuring this out. This is a very shoddy outfit which I strongly suggest people avoid!
- Dave R.
A

Rating
The folks at
Fort Payne Lumber Stores Provider Name Locked
were honest and helpful. They told me right up front it would be 12-14 days before they could even look at it, and that was how long it took. They promised an estimate and gave me one. It turned out the self-propel problem was simply that the cable had come undone. They didn't try to take advantage of me with that - simply reconnected it. They explained that the leaking gas was from varnish forming due to ethanol in gas. Repaired it, suggested ethanol free or treatment for future. When the technician called to give me the estimate he was very friendly and happy to explain it all to me. I am very happy with the service and honesty, and I think the price was fine too. Thank you for doing a good job and for your great customer service.
- Joy H.
A

Rating
Great folks to work with. I measured incorrectly for the sink and ordered the wrong size. Didn't realize it for 3 months!! Had no trouble returning the wrong size sink and getting the correct one. The sales folks were really great. This could have been a real hassle, but it was easy. They have a great selection of items and the showroom is great!!
Am a repeat customer and will definitely continue to shop there.
- John S.
N

Rating
The caulk that I purchased was defective. I brought it back to the store and said to the manager that I want to file a claim to recaulk my window, remove the defective caulk and to have it recaulked. The manager said that it was to much trouble to file a claim. He said I will take care of you at store level. He tricked me, he never took care of the problem and they continue to ignore me. I went up the chain to the office in Atlanta which has a customer resolution process, the lady there
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said we do not treat customers this way and that she would file the claim. She promised me she would call me back with the claim information, she never called back. I then called her and she said I sent you a letter with the claim information. I asked her to read me what she had sent in the mail, she refused to read me any information and told me to wait for the letter. I get a certified lettter from the regional manager barring me from
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worldwide. Threatning me with charges of harrassment and trespassing.
- Maryanne B.
A

Rating
Everything was excellent. I couldn't ask for anything better. There prices are very reasonable. If something goes wrong, you just call them and they come out an fix the problem. I was very happy with them and highly recommend them.
- Dusty & Jean H.
C

Rating
They arrived on time with two installers. The older gentleman seemed to know what he was doing but the younger man proceeded to damage our baseboards while ripping out the carpet. He was told to leave by late morning. We pointed out the damage and the older gentleman admitted that the young man had done this and then offered to fix it with
Fort Payne Lumber Stores Provider Name Locked
's Oil. We told him we didn't think this would work. I relayed the situation to
Fort Payne Lumber Stores Provider Name Locked
and was told to contact their installer. I did so and was treated rudely along with being told that I purchased cheap carpet. Never mind the fact that we paid $2000 for carpet covering a staircase and hallway. On a side note,we were compensated for buying 30 percent too much carpet due to a miscalculation by the installer. Our baseboards remain damaged.
- Melinda J.

All Lumber Stores in Fort Payne, AL

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

Ace Hardware - Jackson

1126 College Ave
Jackson

Assurance Roofing&home improvement

1614 Pinehurst Blvd.
Muscle Shoals

BONDURANT LUMBER WHOLESALE INC

19377 HIGHWAY 31
Flomaton

BUILDERS SUPPLY CO INC

611 GODFREY AVE SE
Fort Payne

CLAWFOOT DESIGNS

479 County Road 590
Fort Payne

David Armstrong

5645 County Road 12
Odenville

DEKALB EQUIPMENT & ENGINEERING

2810 GREENHILL BLVD NW
Fort Payne

DirectBuy of Indianapolis

8450 Westfield Blvd

DIXIE SALVAGE INC

3630 GAULT AVE N
Fort Payne

DOGTOWN HARDWARE

67 COUNTY ROAD
Fort Payne

Johnson Lumber

58 Lofton Avenue
Rainsville

Johnson Lumber Co.

110 Andrew Street
Albertville

KUHN'S TRUE VALUE

2310 GAULT AVE N
Fort Payne

LOWE'S

1600 GLENN BLVD SW
Fort Payne

Lowe's

3101 S. McKenzee St.
Foley

Mels Remodeling LLC

1211 Rutherford RD
Eufaula

Peck Ace Hardware Co

1118 N Wood Ave
Florence

RepairClinic.com Inc

48600 Michigan Ave

The Home Depot - Florence

351 Seville St
Florence

Wiregrass Vinyl Products LLC

2674 Joe Bruer Road
Enterprise

Womacks Hardware & Sporting

107 N. Mt. Pleasant Ave
Monroeville
Fort Payne Zip Codes

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