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Over 465 reviews for
Greensboro Stamped Concrete Contractors from people just like you.

"Owner called two days prior for job to start and stated they were having problems with peeling for this procedure and would not be able to do.. I asked for my" $100 deposit and was assured via text it would be refunded.I have also sent another text and called regarding the refund and have yet to receive a call or my money back

-Michele B.

" and his staff were the consumate professionals. His quote, start date, and explanation of the work involved was followed to the letter. We" asked a lot of questions before our committment and he was very patient and answered everything in detail, providing pictures of their work and references that we could call. His staff showed up on time, were very conscientious to watch the plants and lawn around their work area, and to pick up and clean up each day when they left. We have recommended them for other jobs and would definitely use them again.

-Linda L.

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Local Articles in Greensboro

a stamped concrete patio

Stamped Concrete Adds Affordable Appeal to Outdoor Patios

Many homeowners are opting for stamped concrete patios that mimic the look of stone, brick or tile. Perfect for any outdoor area, such as surrounding a pool, stamped concrete offers the ability to get creative with patterns and colors.

Black Hawk pilot James Hagerty and his wife, Samantha, of Port Wentworth, Ga., say Angie's List is invaluable in finding reputable contractors. (Photo by John Carrington)
Concrete - Pouring & Repair, Concrete - Stamped & Decorative, Plumbing, Remodeling - General, Remodeling - Kitchen & Bathroom, Roofing

Hiring a reliable service provider can be a difficult matter when a loved one serves overseas, but Angie's List can help on the homefront.

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Customer of Atlas Constructions Inc. in Austin, Texas, says the company was not properly equipped to handle concrete work.

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Angie's Answers


Bids are NOT done based on a multiplier on top of materials cost to get labor cost. Think of the consequences in the example you gave - by that method using say plain home depot tile made in Honduras might cost $5/SF materials, so by your method $10 labor. Now, same floor, with Carerra marble or Barre Granite at $75-100/SF - so do you want him charging you $150-200/SF labor when it takes almost exactly the same time regardless of material ?

To put it in simple terms, contractors:

1) figure the amount and cost of materials and consumables needed from the plans and specifications, applying a markup (from 15-50%, depending on contractor and how fancy or specialized a job it is).

2) Then they figure the equipment needed and the operating time to be used or elapsed time to be rented or leased - either opperating hour or elapsed time, or combination of both, especially if it consumes fuel

3) They then figure the labor time for the various trades required to do the job, maybe add an efficiency or ease of work multiplier to those hours to fit the job conditions, multiply those hours by the hourly pay rates, then multiply that times the "load" or "Labor Overhead" to account for employment taxes, workman's compensation costs, health plan, etc, etc.

4) Then they add in the cost of any architect or engineer plans or certifications that are needed, government permits and inspections, etc.

5) Then they add in any subcontractor bids, with appropriate contingency amount for each.

6) All those above totals are added up, an appropriate overall contingency added if needed (typically 5-10%, but on remote site jobs I have seen as high as 200%), and (depending on how contractor figures his costs) at least all the "in-house" costs like his equipment, consumables, and labor costs have a percentage overhead and profit added to them - typically about 100-150%. Some contractors use a lower overhead percentage but apply it to the total estimated job cost, not just in-house costs.

This "company overhead" or "general overhead" or "G&A - General and Administrative Overhead" covers the costs of financing and running the company, management and secretarial and general supply and maintenance costs, buildings and equipment yards lease or mortgage cost, working capital cost, insurance, loan interest, general shop equipment payments, profit, etc. Some contractors use a lower overhead and apply it to every cost in the job, some (especially those doing government work so havingto adhere to government accounting rules) apply a "markup percentage" to materials and rental costs and outside subcontract services, and apply G&A overhead only to in-house costs.


That being said, for a general class of work it does generally (on normal jobs) work out that there is a general multiple of labor to materials cost. For instance, yard work and residential tree work is heavy on labor, so it might have a labor to materials ratio of 3:1 or even 5:1.  Detail foundation hand excavation and underpinning can run to 5:1 or more. Many types of building construction like plumbing, tile, carpentry, etc. do end up with a very roughly 2:1 or 3:1 ratio of labor to materials cost. At the other extreme, high energy efficiency or hurricane rated glass installation or a fancy full-building computer and communications system or high-end entertainment center might have a labor to materials ratio of 0.25-0.5 because it is designed to go in pretty fast, but the materials cost a lot.

For your case, a hardscaping ratio could run from 0.5:1 or less to as much as 3:1 or more, for installations with very expensive imported stone and fancy woods and a lot of bought decorative items such as statuary, to the opposite labor-intensive landscaping with lots of sidehill terracing and hand-planted flower beds, hand-dug irrigation system trenches, and manual-placed concrete block or railroad tie walls. Each job should be figured on its own merits - using a "rule-of-thumb" is where people commonly get unpleasantly surprised. That is why you typically get 3 bids unless you have a contractor you trust from prior experience and are confident will give you a fair shake regardless of being sole-sourced. Personally, both for my own purposes and professionally in the design and construction business, I have found sole-source to trusted contractors you have experience with is, in the long run, a BIG money and time saver, as well as making it far more likely to finish on schedule and let you sleep at night.


You need a general contractor - prefereably one who specializes in additions, because you have excavation, waterproofing, concrete, concrete cutting, carpentry, door and window, etc trades to coordinate.

The cost will depend a great deal on your topography around the house - if the base of the window will be above ground level at least 6 inches, then could run about $500 for a legal egress window purchase and about $1000-2000 for installation, depending on how deep into the concrete you have to cut.

If the bottom of the window will be below ground level, then to call it a bedroom (which mandates legal sized second egress and usauully at least one window)  then you will have two choices - bring it out into a solid watertight concrete storm cellar with collar to keep water out, stairs, and and weather and bug-tight cellar door that is inward-opening, which means a lot of space for stairs and landings top and bottom, or bring it out into an oversized window well at least 36 inches in diameter, and with steps to ground level, with adequate drainage and waterproofing to keep it dry. Either way, sometimes about as easy to put in an outside door as a window, and might raise property value more. Cost from $2-5,000 depending on how deep into concrete wall you have to dig, whether concrete wsall needs reinforcing with steel frame because of the depth of cut, how easy the digging is, and what your water conditions are near the foundation. The last thing you want to do is create an easy water or vermin ingress with your egress.


The cost to install the veneer stone has a wide range do to many factors. It can range from around $9 to $17 per square foot. It depends on the location, the stone being used, job access, skaffolding needs, wall prep and such. I would think you would be on the lower end of the scale. Your job is on a concrete surface so it eliminates one of the biggest problems they are having with this product, wall preperation. This one of the things that separates the high bidders from the low ones. There are million dollars homes being torn down because of improper wall prep. One a wood frame house a backing system that allows drainage is a must or the moisture absorbed by the veneer can rot the walls behind with alarming speed. Some have had makor damage within the first four years. On a concrete wall the veneer needs no such prep at most wire mesh applied if it is an older concrete wall.



Stamped Concrete Contractors in Greensboro

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

3rd Generation Sparks Masonry

170 Sparkle Ln

Adams Roofing and Restorations

4016 H Battleground Ave. Ste310

AKR Builders

3924 S Holden Rd

All & All Maintenance & Cleaning LLC

1457 Embler Rd

All Things Wood Inc

4105 Chatham Hill Dr
Winston Salem

Big and Small Roberts Concrete Finishers

348 Junia Ave.
Winston Salem

Bobby's Concrete Inc

310 Concord St


Winston Salem

Brooks Stonework/Handyman Service

3162 Hwy 62 East

c&p construction

5626 Atwater Rd

C2 Contractors, LLC

405 Banner Avenue

Camden Landscape Group

4016H Battleground Ave. #323

Carolina Custom Concrete

1005 Mustang Dr

Carolina Decorative Concrete

1764 Highway 66 South

Carolina Surface Pros, LLC

P.O. Box 729 US Highway 158

Clavel Construction

7704 Notees LN




Winston Salem

Dalton Contracting, LLC

P.O. Box 1367

Dalton's Quality Concrete

3910 Wildlife Drive

Deck Specialist & Outdoor Living

2 Centerview Drive

Decorative Concrete Unlimited Inc

101 Nutwood Dr

Dream, Design & Build, LLC

803 Celtic Crossing Drive
High Point

Elevate Construction Inc

1000 S Fairfield Drive


305 Linville Rd

F.I.T.S. Right Tree Service

135 Midway Forrest Dr

Fast Concrete LLC

515 Ireland St

FreeBird Construction

1435 Grantville Lane

Gallery Builders Inc.

4425 S. Main St.
Winston Salem


5301 Tower Rd

Greensboro Designs and Textures

P.O. Box 8981

Handyman Solutions Co.

5000 lassiter mill rd

Hills Paving and Construction Inc

1731 Williams Road

KC's Improvement & Construction Co Inc

3118 Battleground Ave

Larmore Landscape Assoc. Inc.

2581 Landscape Drive
Winston Salem

Marlowe Painting

101 Sagewood Rd

Medina Concrete

1901 Avis Dr

Mike Fusco Builder

1201 S. Crescent Drive

NC Benchmark




One Guy And A Machine

PO Box 363

Page Concrete

5804 Election Oak Dr
High Point

Perfect Coats Painting & Remodeling

8031 Goldenrain Way

Piedmont Renovation

512 E Keme Ave.

Prestige Real Estate Solutions, llc

P.O. Box 454

Pure Texture

3123-K Cedar Park Rd

Radiance Glow Hard Surface Cleaning

4393 Kelso Dr
High Point


2618 Battleground Ave

Roberson Builders & Home Improvements

P O Box 1681

RR Concrete Design

4104 Elmyra Dr

Stone Arbor Land Works

252 Lucerne Ln
Winston Salem

Superior Lawn and Landscaping Inc

612 Knollwood St
Winston Salem

T. Simmons Backhoe & Concrete

7507 Doggit Road
Browns Summit

Tedder Construction

2024 Pine Bluff St.

Timberline services

246 mustang dr

Tink's Home Improvements

2207 burch bridge rd

Toledo Concrete, LLC

3815 mossyrock rd

Toms Creek Nursery & Landscaping, Inc


TW Construction Services LLC

4079 Benton Creek Dr
Winston Salem


320 S ELM ST


12637 S 265 W Suite 100

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