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Over 367 reviews for
Grand Rapids Hardware Stores from people just like you.

A
"We went to
for a closet organizer and some odds and ends for our new house. Found everything we needed with the help of the associates at"
. Wonderful experience all the way around.

-Stephanie B.

F
"I contracted to have my kitchen counter tile removed and new tile installed. The job was not to my satisfaction. I took pictures and expressed my concerns at
" . The epoxy grout was not installed correctly and permanently stained, the tile was cut poorly with chipped edges and the layout was poorly planned. (
subcontracted this work to one of their contractors) When I called
, explaining my dillemma, no one would take my future calls. The "person I needed to talk with" was always either in a meeting or not working that day. I finally went into the store and asked to see him personally. I was told he was in a 2-hour meeting. I returned in 2 hours and was told he was in another 2-hour meeting. At this point, I said, "Fine. I'll wait". The person I needed to talk with appeared in about 15 minutes. I showed him my photos of the stained grout, micro-photos of the chipped tile edges, and the poor layout. We have several outlets on the back wall...none were the same height, The tile placement was not balanced when a partial tile was needed.
solution was to come to my house and grind out all of the grout and replace it. That was not satisfactory to me. They sent a man to the house to see my complaints and offered to replace the grout again. I demanded my money back and they again sent someone to the house, supposedly with a check. He came to the house and said he was not authorized to give me my money back until he saw actual demolition of the counter top. At this point, my mother had a stroke and in time died. Several months later, I hired a tile person to remove the
installed tile and re-tile the counter. The epoxy grout was used correctly, the tile were cut cleanly, and the layout was perfectly symmetrical with the outlets even in height. During the demolition of the counter top, I called
. They came and saw the removal, gave me my check and left. This time two people representing
came. The man who had been here before and a female representative. The female representative extended her apologies on behalf of
. I will never hire
to do any actual work/home repair/installations for me. However, I do shop at
for plants, tools, etc. and am pleased with their products. b

-Linda L.

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Architects & Building Design, Billiard Table Repair, Billiard Table Sales, Builders - Homes, Carpentry - Unfinished, Carpentry - Woodworking, Closets, Entertainment/Parties, Epoxy Flooring, Handymen, Hardware & Home Improvement Stores, Interior Design & Decorating, Remodeling - Basements, Remodeling - General, Stereo & Home Theater Systems, TV Sales, TV Service - Cable, TV Service - Satellite

Consider your home's layout to decide if an existing space can be converted into a game room or if you'll need to add on.

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Car-sharing programs can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by taking more cars off the road and reducing traffic congestion.

Angie's Answers

?
Todd said it best.

An itemized list / cost breakdown, more often than not is used against the contractor when it is shared with other builders who will then beat it.

Good contractors use good people, and good people cost more.  Just the cost of having the appropriate insurance / bond can be the difference between winning a job or losing it ot a 'lower bid'.

It is the rule of three; there is Good, Cheap and Fast.  You can have any two:  Good and Cheap, won't be Fast; Good and Fast, won't be Cheap;  Cheap and Fast, won't be Good!

When comparing bids, it isn't the cheapest or the 'nicest' person you should select.   You should understand why there is a large price difference (it shows there are gaps in your design program or what you have asked for specifically, which means there may be arguments later).  If most of the bids are in line, and one is way high or way low,  you want to know why before dismissing or selecting them.

A price-only decision almost always costs more in the long run. 

Good luck!
?

No.  Heck no.  Here's a good example.  We very recently needed to find someone to install about 500 square feet of exotic wood flooring (we already have the materials).  We contacted about 12-15 top-rated Angieslist contractors.  Out of the few who did get back to us, we got 5 quotes, 2 of them were literally just over the phone.  They "didn't feel it would be necessary to even see the space". 

 

Here were the bids: 

$4000 (sight unseen), $2800 (sight unseen), $2500, $1500, $1450

 

We didn't "share our budget for this".  Why would we?  We asked them to bid the job.  That's it.  All of them should be well-qualified and they are all highly rated.  We were interested in how THEY value their time/resources - for an apples/apples job. 

 

Do you still think that you should tell them about your budget?  Your choice.  From my standpoint it isn't their business.  I'm asking them to bid on a project.  Invariably I'll get some very high bids, medium bids and a few more reasonable ones - ALL from "highly rated contractors". 

?
For this type of job, you need plans and specs from an Architectural/Engineering firm before thinking about contractors - and to get a building permit. Ben's method would work and done incrementally could cost well over $100,000 plus as he says, but this not really the most economic way to approach this big a job. A House Mover or Foundation Underpinning specialty company can usually slide your house onto a whole new foundation, or jack it up on steel beams and hold it there while a basement is dug underneath it, without any intermediate piers. The jacking/move cost would probably be on the order of $30-40,000, and a new basement probably about $40-50,000 - rough ballpark, though I have been involved in some 1000-1500SF single story jobs that went for under $70,000 total. I have been involved in a fair number of these type jobs - and the way the numbers come out, if there is room on the property to move the house, it is almost always nearly as cheap or cheaper to build an equivalent square footage (basement plus ground level) addition rather than add a basement under the house, and that way your new footage is half above ground so worth more on resale, plus you do not lose use of the house for a month or two. Second cheapest is usually sliding house to a new foundation, if property is large enough to do this - though house is totally cut off from utilities for a week to three. Most expensive, and usually only done in tight city environments or with full 2 story or higher houses, is adding the foundation in place, though your utility interruptions should be on the order of hours at a time rather than days or weeks. Talk to an architect - I think you will quickly lean towards the addition option rather than adding a basement - it is just too expensive to deepen foundations in most cases, plus you WILL get cracking in the house and possible water and sewer pipe problems in a move/underpinning job, which is not the case with an addition. This become more likely the case since you want to add 8 feet off the back of the home anyway - so why not just enlarge the addition and do it all that way - MUCH simpler, and MUCH less disruption of your life, and you get much higher resale return on your investment.
?

Herlonginc's answer stated that it is not the contractor's job to pay for materials and labor to do the job. I say baloney - a reputable, established contractor has the funds (or a business operations line of credit) to "carry" the job between interim or partial payments, each of which should be keyed to completion of distinct easily measured mileposts in the job, and for a homeowner I would say should be in not more than 20% increments for jobs exceeding a week or so. For shorter jobs, then an initial payment, 50% completion, and completion would be normal. His cost of carry funds is part of his cost of doing business, and is figured as part of his overhead.Bear in mind when he is buying materials and paying labor, his materials he typically pays for on a 10-30 day invoice, and his labor typically a week or two after they work, so he is not really "fronting" that much money if you are giving him weekly or biweekly interim payments, on a typical residential job.

If he does not have the funds to buy materials (excepting possibly deposit on special-order or luxury items, which still typically are 10-30 day invoiceable to him) and hire personnel then he is a fly-by-night operation, and he should not be bidding that size job. You should never (other than MAYBE an earnest deposit of not more than the LESSER of 10% or $5000) let the payments get ahead of the approved/inspected work progress - typically payment should be 10-20% BEHIND the progress, with at least 10% retained at the effective end of work until final inspections and completion of the final "punchlist".

That promotes rapid continuation of the work, discourages the all-too common nightmare of contractors taking on more work than they can handle so they leave your job for weeks or months to go work on someone else's job (frequently to start that someone else's new job so he can get the job), and does not leave you out a tremendous amount of cash if he does not finish and you have to hire another contractor to finish the job. Remember, if you have to hire a new contractor to finish the job, he will charge you a lot more than the original bid to finish someone else's unfinished mess.

This may seem cynical, but having started in the construction business about 50 years ago and seeing the shenanigans that a lot of contractors pull you cannot be too safe. You have to remember contractors are like any other people - I would say maybe 10% are outright crooks, another 25% or so will pull a fast one or overcharge if the opportunity presents itself, maybe 30% will do the work but not any better than they are forced to, about 25% are good conscientious reputable workmen, and the last 10% or so are really spectacular - conscientious, fair, and efficient craftsmen. This top 35% are the only ones you should have bidding in the first place. Therefore, only get bids from long-term reputable firms (so you shake out the marginal short-timers with less experience and also generally less ability to finish the job on budget and schedule), only those that have good RECENT references, and preferably with excellent word-of-mouth recommendation from people you know and trust. That way, you are starting right off with the cream of the crop, so hopefully whichever one bids low should be a good choice.

NEVER start with bids, then check the references of the low bidder - why even consider a vendor or contractor who you do not have faith in from the start ? Get references and short-list you possibles BEFORE you ask for bids.

Low bids - that is another matter - commonly the low bidder is NOT who you want, especially if he is significantly lower than several others, which might mean he is desperate for work, made a math error, or did not correctly figure the entire scope of work. You want a reasonable bid with someone you connect with and trust - that is worth a lot more in the success of the job than the absolute lowest bid.

 

?
You should always get a set of print and pull a permit when remodeling you home. It is a good thing that you want to be involved in your project. I do have some reservation about the electrical work. There is a lot at risk with doing the work yourself. If the house burns down you will never get the insurance money, unless your a certified electrician. Now of days 90% of home fires are blamed on electrical problems because the insurance company is to lazy and cheap to investigate the true problem. Also find out if the city you live in will allow you to perform the work. Make sure you coordinate your subs to have the proper time and space to perform their job. You don't want people working on top of each other. If you order all you materials make sure everything is there before you start your project. Have your subs check for proper and full items to be installed. Make sure every sub has a working set of prints. Make sure you have all the demo done before your subs show up to work. Schedule your plumber first, do any final framing or electrical work while you wait for inspection. Electrical inspection next followed by framing, insulation, and wallboard. All subs must get a final inspection on the job before you (the GC) can call in your final inspection.
?
The answer depends on your contract.  If you do not have a written contract, you need to begin documenting everything.  Begin by using a calendar and marking the days the contractor started, worked, you had to speak to him/her about the work, etc.

Next photograph the work you feel is sub-par.  If work has been corrected, photograph it now to have a record of its condition.  If you have any "original" or "before work began" pictures get those together, too.

If you do have written contract, see what it says about warranties, complaints, failure to finish / comply, etc.  Holding the money may end up with the contractor taking YOU to court for the funds - you cannot just hold the money.  You need to document in writing what is wrong, what you expect to happen (be specific) and when it should happen by.  A good contract will explain if and how money can be held, how the arbitration or complaint is filed, etc.

You should also invite another contractor to come in and bid the work to finish the job.  They can confirm the quality of the work and give you a price to fix / finish the job.  This gives you justification for holding the funds and an option to finish the job.

If the contractor is not willing to fix the work or listen to direction, do not allow them back in the house.  A judge will ask you why you let them continue to do work if you found it unacceptable.  Take back the key or access to the building - you can also attempt holding any materials or tools as collateral if the cost of repair is higher than the amount owed.  Again, document what you are holding, its estimated value (google or ebay search), etc.

Finally, in writing you should fire the contractor and state the exact reason(s).  Document everything; if it is done in person after they leave make notes of what was said, agreed upon and disputed.  If you are satisfied that what you have paid is fair compensation for the work done, make sure this is noted in the letter firing the contractor.  If you feel money is owed, you will need to file a small claim in your local court.  Include the documentation you made, notes, letters, etc. when you file your claim so the judge will have a copy of everything.  Don't forget to contact the BBB.

Do not wait for the court date; go ahead and hire the other contractor and have the work completed.  Bring this invoice to court with you (file it before the court date if you can).  Bring photos of the finished work (again, file it with the court before the date if possible).  You must show what good quality work looks like vs the poor quality work.

Otherwise it will be a your word against the contractor and you will most likely lose, (the contract is a promise to pay for work) or even if you "win" you will most likely split the difference between the argued amount of money.  Also be prepared for the contractor to file a small court claim against you.  Same process as above, except now you will respond to the summons with a copy of your stuff to defend your reason for holding funds instead of asking for money back.

Good luck!

Hardware Store reviews in Grand Rapids

A

Rating
I chose
Grand Rapids Hardware Stores Provider Name Locked
because I knew they would have the part and I wanted to save a trip to one of the Big Box stores. My old tub/shower diverter was going bad and leaking so I decided to replace it. Should be an easy fix, right? Just take off the old one, put a new one on and you're good to go. Well, not so fast. I unscrewed the old diverter to find out that the old galvanized
Grand Rapids Hardware Stores Provider Name Locked
was so old and corroded, that it came out of the wall and stayed with the diverter. I purchased a diverter online and went to
Grand Rapids Hardware Stores Provider Name Locked
to get a new
Grand Rapids Hardware Stores Provider Name Locked
. They were able to get me the right part and provided some advice on what to do.
I brought it the old parts along with the new diverter I planned to use. The problem was that the new diverter wasn't the correct size (my fault for buying before measuring). This caused an extra tip to the store. I wasn't exactly clear that my new diverter wouldn't work but that's mostly my fault for not asking the question.
If you're looking for a part, call these guys first. You'll save yourself the hassle and headache of traveling to a bunch of different stores. Plus, these guys have a ton of experience and will be able to provide some advice that other stores may not be able to offer.
- Dwight D.

Hardware Stores in Grand Rapids

Companies below are listed in alphabetical order. To view top rated service providers along with reviews and ratings, Join Angie's List Now!

84 LUMBER CO

4625 CLAY AVE SW
Grand Rapids

ACCENT MASONRY LLC

5631 E PARIS AVE SE
Grand Rapids

ACE FIX IT

1234 Michigan St NE
Grand Rapids

ACE HARDWARE

4300 REMEMBRANCE RD NW
Grand Rapids

Alger Hardware & Rental

2408 Eastern Ave SE
Grand Rapids

ALLIED BUILDING PRODUCTS CORP

3718 Buchanan Ave SW
Grand Rapids

ALUMINUM SUPPLY CO INC

14359 MEYERS RD
Detroit

Apex Spring Stamping Corporation

11420 1st Ave NW
Grand Rapids

ARROW ENTERPRISES INC

6157 28TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

Beckett Home Improvement

1348 Front Ave NW
Grand Rapids

BLUE CIRCLE PRODUCTS

1010 PARMELEE AVE NW
Grand Rapids

BLUE LINX

825 BUCHANAN AVE SW
Grand Rapids

BRADSHAW INTERNATIONAL

550 3 MILE RD NW
Grand Rapids

Brickhouse Security

980 Avenue of the Americas

BROOKS APPLEGATE CO

1616 OLSON ST NE
Grand Rapids

Builders License Training Institute

5112 US 31 N
Grand Rapids

BUILDERS PLUMBING SUPPLY CO

89 54TH ST SW
Grand Rapids

CLEVER COOK

6734 Burton St SE
Grand Rapids

CONSUMERS CONCRETE CORP

O-10600 LINDEN DR NW
Grand Rapids

COSTCO

5100 28TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

D BAKER & SON LUMBER CO

720 Pennoyer Ave
Grand Haven

EIKENHOUT INC

346 WEALTHY ST SW
Grand Rapids

ERB LUMBER

3400 ROGER B CHAFFEE MEMORIAL
Grand Rapids

ETNA SUPPLY

701 36TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

FULTON HEIGHTS MOWER SALES

1311 FULTON ST E
Grand Rapids

Godwin Plumbing Inc.

3703 S Division Ave.
Grand Rapids

Godwin West Hardware & Plumbing

1639 Chicago Dr SW
Wyoming

HOME DEPOT

257 54TH ST SW
Grand Rapids

InHouz

201 Washington Ave
Zeeland

J MOLLEMA & SON INC

4660 EAST PARIS AVE SE
Grand Rapids

JIM'S TRUE VALUE HARDWARE

1644 BALL AVE NE
Grand Rapids

JMC LOGISTICS

5130 PATTERSON AVE SE
Grand Rapids

JOHN ANTHONY MILLWORKS

542 GRANDVILLE AVE SW
Grand Rapids

JOHNSON'S WORKBENCH

563 N COCHRAN AVE M-50
Charlotte

KUTSCHE'S HARDWARE & IND SUPL

307 LEONARD ST NW
Grand Rapids

LA GRAND LUMBER

2424 RIDGEPARK DR SE
Grand Rapids

LOUIS T OLLESHEIMER & SON

5770 Clay Ave SW
Grand Rapids

LOWES

3330 28TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

LOWES

4297 PLAINFIELD AVE. NE.
Grand Rapids

LOWES

2035 E SHERMAN BLVD
Muskegon

MAGHIELSE TOOL CORP

731 BROADWAY AVE NW
Grand Rapids

Menards

5555 CLYDE PARK AVENUE SW

Menards - Grand Rapids

3639 28th St SE
Grand Rapids

MICHIGAN INDUSTRIAL TOOLS

420 36TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

MILLER ZEILSTRA DO IT BEST

833 MICHIGAN ST NE
Grand Rapids

Nawara Brothers Home Store

1030 W Fulton St
Grand Rapids

NORTH COAST COMMERCIAL ROOFING

3480 JEFFERSON AVE SE
Grand Rapids

PROGRESSIVE HARDWARE LTD

O701 LAKE MICHIGAN DR NW
Grand Rapids

QUALITY SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

1562 68TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

QUARRY RIDGE STONE

555 76TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

R & R PLUMBING

6374 60TH AVE
Hudsonville

RepairClinic.com Inc

48600 Michigan Ave
Canton

RICE VENEER & LUMBER CO

20 LEONARD ST NW
Grand Rapids

RICHARDS MANUFACTURING CO

725 IONIA AVE SW
Grand Rapids

Rycenga Building Ctr

1053 Jackson St
Grand Haven

S B HARDWARE LLC

31 44TH ST SW
Grand Rapids

SAW SYSTEMS

5068 CORBIN DR
Grand Rapids

SNOW ENGINEERING

3300 JEFFERSON AVE SE
Grand Rapids

SOLID-FLUE CHIMNEY SYSTEMS INC

4937 STARR ST SE
Grand Rapids

Soundrite-Acoustics, Inc.

209 S. Stephanie Street

Standale Interiors

4046 Lake Michigan Dr NW
Grand Rapids

STANDARD BUILDING SYSTEMS

3147 FRUIT RIDGE AVE NW
Grand Rapids

STANDARD SUPPLY & LUMBER

1535 Kalamazoo Ave
Grand Rapids

TOM DE YOUNG ENGINE & MOWER

3642 CLYDE PARK AVE SW
Wyoming

TRUE TOOL CNC REGRINDING

14110 IRONWOOD DR
Grand Rapids

UNIQUE TOOL & DIE

4400 DONKERS CT SE
Grand Rapids

Van's Sport Center

1855 Alpine Ave NW
Grand Rapids

VECTOR MARKETING CORP

950 28TH ST SE
Grand Rapids

WINCHESTER & VAN KELLEN LUMBER

395 44TH ST SW
Grand Rapids

Woodways Industries

700 Construction Court
Zeeland

Zeeland Lumber

143 E Washington Ave
Zeeland

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