Ask Angie: Why is the Price of R-22 A/C Coolant Going Up?

Talk with your HVAC specialist to determine the best solution for your coolant problems. (Photo courtesy of Robert Nettgen)

Talk with your HVAC specialist to determine the best solution for your coolant problems. (Photo courtesy of Robert Nettgen)

Dear Angie: I recently had a heating and cooling contractor out to my home to inspect my air conditioner. He told me I was low on coolant and that it would cost more than $200 to add what I need. I had this done just a few years ago and the cost was significantly less. Am I being scammed? – Kathy B., Indianapolis.

Dear Kathy: The good news is that it’s very unlikely your heating and cooling specialist is trying to scam you. The bad news is that he’s likely right about the significant cost increase for the refrigerant.

If your air conditioner was manufactured before 2010, it could use an A/C coolant known as R-22. The Environmental Protection Agency ordered the phasing out of R-22 because of the refrigerant's ozone-depleting properties and in its place is a new, more environmentally friendly refrigerant called R410A. The new coolant, though, won’t work with the older R-22 units.

Because the old refrigerant is no longer being produced for new air conditioners, it is instead being reclaimed from older HVAC units as they’re replaced, but as it has become scarcer, the price has gone up and will only continue to increase. Industry experts I’ve talked to say the prices have jumped from about $30 for the first pound of refrigerant just two years ago to as much as $175 now, though prices can vary significantly by company based on how much of the coolant they have on hand and how much they paid for it when they purchased it. That is why it’s a good idea to call around to get prices before you have more R-22 added to your unit. Ninety percent of the refrigerant will be phased out by 2015 and it will be virtually obsolete by 2020.

Related: What is a Fair Price for R-22?

What this means for you and homeowners in similar situations is that you must decide how you want to proceed. Do you continue to invest high repair costs in your older unit, or do you replace it with a newer, more efficient unit? Given the high price of this refrigerant, the question has also been raised, Is it possible to overfill an air conditioner with R-22?

I recommend having a conversation with a licensed heating and cooling technician with a good reputation to discuss your specific situation and examine all your options. You could get several more years out of your unit, or it could be more cost effective now to replace it. Be sure any HVAC technician you hire who handles refrigerant holds the required EPA certification before allowing them to work with the fluid.

Angie Hicks is founder of Angie's List. Email questions to askangie@angieslist.com or tweet to #AskAngie. Follow Angie at @Angie_Hicks.


Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story originally posted on June 12, 2012.


More Like This

4 questions about the R-22 refrigerant phase-out

westinghouse-outdoor-air-conditioner.jpg

(Photo courtesy of Westinghouse HVAC)
(Photo courtesy of Westinghouse HVAC)

R-22 is a refrigerant that has been used in air conditioners and heat pumps for years. Unfortunately, it contains chemical compounds that deplete the ozone layer and contribute to global warming. The EPA has deemed R-22 production must cease by the year 2020.

Comments

Prices vary from company to company. you need to make a decision on what benefits you are receiving for what you are paying. We have flat rate pricing for up to 2lbs of r-22. This covers the tech setting up to accurately charge a system and take various temperature readings to properly determine an accurate charge. We are $72/lb after the first 2 lbs. This covers labor as well. We also weigh the refrigerant bottle prior to taking it off the truck and then putting it back on so we are accurate on the charges to the owner. So what is fair is based on what you determine fair. If you need your air fixed that afternoon then maybe $100 is fair on a 95 degree day from a large company that can be there in an hour. whereas the company charging $50/lb is booked 2 weeks out. At the end of the day there are expenses that need to be paid and employees that need to remained employed and refrigerant is another means of keeping the doors open. So you cannot solely base price on markup over the expense of refrigerant. This applies to all industries of business. If we were charging units year round every day i would expect the cost to have a unit re-charged would go down. however service is not a steady work flow so all markups and labor rates take into consideration the "downtime" which can occur on a daily basis.

I see no other issue here except paying for services someone provides.

I was reading a post to you on a customer thinking they may have been scammed by a technician charging a much higher cost to add R-22 to there existing A/C unit. The cost has gone up significantly therefore the cost to the customer needs to go up. You left out one major subject to your customers Angie! The customer said they had just had R-22 added to there system and now having to add more at a more significant cost. First of all how much was added and if you just had freon added why again. The law requires that the leak needs to be repaired to assure no more leaking. Not to say more leaks wont pop up on the units refrigerant lines. But after the leak is detected then it needs to be repaired and a vacume run on the system to assure no other leaks. By EPA regulations and laws you are required to fix the leak before just adding Refrigerant to a system. This would be known as knowingly venting and could result in a fine of up to $20.000 per incident and 5 years in jail. I've been in the field now for just over 30 years and can't believe what I have seen out there. Hacks that are not even EPA certified and somehow get there hands on refrigerant and charge systems up and just go on there way. Or they charge customers for Freon they never even added to the system. Tell your customers they need to ask and see the technicians EPA certification card. By the way you need to have this card on hand if asked and you are required to have recovery equipment as well on your truck. Just saying.

While most of the above statements are true, the real underlying problem is that most units may not be losing it's charge, instead mainly the condenser coil is clogged with debris not allowing the air flow through to remove the heat from the refrigerant as well as the evaporator coil being clogged with debris not allowing the refrigerant to remove the heat from the living space. I'd been to a lot of units where only 3 lb to 5 lb was the maximum charge. After cleaning the coils and rechecking the pressures, I had to reclaim the refrigerant because the units were way overly charged by unqualified techs (crooks) that are giving the rest of us techs a bad name. In a lot of those units I had removed as much as 10 lbs from a 3.5 lb unit! That's what the pressure gages are for, if the head pressure is 500 lbs or more the tech should know to clean the coil, instead of adding more refrigerant. When I got into this business, a 30 lb bottle of R-22 was $35.00. Today 01 March 2013, it's now $450.00. Do the math. Also check the techs gages to see if they're clean and look fairly new, old ones can give deceiving readings. And now as for R-410A, that's a nasty refrigerant, it'll burn the skin right off a techs fingers and hands by not being careful. It also runs at much higher pressure and if your old unit is 10 years or more, it may create leaks because of the pressure. So a new unit will be required and all I can say is, hopefully you can afford it or else sweat. Also, the techs have to pass another EPA test in order to purchase the R-410A as well as purchasing the new units. I'm now 68 & out of the business. Good fortune to Y'all.

Thank you for posting this I'm a single woman and always get taken to the cleaners. I will certainly keep all this in mind for the next check up. Sorry to hear your retired we need more guys out there like you. Thank you for being honest, God Bless.

Just had my AC recharged with a pound and a half of R134. Cost: 18 bucks. Where? Texas, of course.

I am in the A.C.business and have been for 20 years.I am in Texas and pay around 13.00 per pound for R22.I sell it for 26.00 per pound.The real reason it went up so much a few months back is the E.P.A.IS ONLY ALLOWING THE COMPANIES THAT PRODUCE R22 TO PRODUCE 50%OF WHAT THEY DID LAST YEAR.When that announcement was made the very next day the prices sky rocketed.Supply and demand.Thats it in a nutshell.

I remember readin in the late 90's and early 2000's from several 'conservative' sources that rebuked the R-12 ozone depletion theory that one launch of the space shuttle does more damage to the ozone than every oucne of Freon ever, ever, ever released into the atmosphere. Just one launch. Although I've never seen proof, I've also heard that DuPont, who holds the original patent on R-12 Freon helped perpetrate the ozone depleting myth, since their patent was running out and they wanted to create a new product that they would hold full patent rights on. I believe it!

Dupont holds all the patents for any freon and has been licensing it to be manufactured all over the world. Some time in the 90's their patents started to expire so the pressure of lost profits raised its ugly head. About this same time a volcano at the south pole began to erupt spewing more chlorine gas into the air everyday than all the freon ever manufactured contained. This created a giant hole in the ozone layer which was conveniently blamed on freon refrigerants. This led to black balling all freon and the US banned it's production but not any other countries. Most of the increased cost of freon is taxes placed on it by the US government. It still costs about $1.00 per pound to produce r-12. Our generous friends at DuPont have graciously invented new refrigerants to take the place of the old ones. They all are blends and still contain vast amounts of freon. Now, since all freons have been banned here in the US, the hole in the ozone has magically closed up and coincidentally, the volcano at the south pole has again gone dormant. Coincidentally, all the patents for the new refrigerants are again held by our benevolent friends at DuPont. I think I smell a very large rat.

Let's be clear. Any AC unit should NEVER "leak" or lose coolant over time. This is NOT normal. An AC unit is a closed system and it is NOT normal for coolant/refrigerant to "leak" out over time. If any AC tech tells you this, stop and walk away and do not let them touch your system! This includes your home AC unit or your car. Could you imagine if your refrigerator had to be "recharged" every year???!!! If your system is losing coolant, it has a leak and needs to be corrected. Simple. The argument about a shortage on coolant is also a farce. There is no shortage at all. There is so much coolant in storage around the world, we could never run out. This is an excuse to jack up the price on you. I have several friends in the Commercial HVAC business and all tell me the same thing. We could stop producing all coolant right now, and we would have enough that is in storage for the next 500 years! Just to add, we recently our system checked out and it cost $125. (We live in NY) The company went through the whole system, cleaned the coils, checked the pressure in both units, checked all the fans and blowers, etc. They were here about 45 minutes in all. Our system is over 10 years old and still to this day, never has coolant been added! Please be aware and do your homework and do not listen to these scammers. Good luck.

When R-12 was replaced many years ago, the story was that R-22 was too heavy to make it to the ozone layer so did not pose a threat. My guess is that someone saw how much money was being made from the phase out of R-12 that the facts were altered to meet the desire to make money.

Great. Now I don't know what to think. Without mentioning any conspiracies, I've verified the wholesale R-22 prices quoted in other comments, but have also just paid $60 / lb for R-22 from an A-rated company from this service. I realize that I can't necessarily expect from this service the same type of consumer information / protection that I might receive from an organization like Consumer Reports, but a straight, consistent answer would be welcome.

I help manage the property of my church. We have a large number of AC unit on our campus. Our HVAC company suggested we could save a sizeable cost on our upkeep by buy and having available R22 for our own use. He arrange to get 2 tanks, which we store and are available to him to service our needs. Our price per pound went from $ 45 to under $16. I don't know of too many companires willing to suggest an opportunity like this. He will also save us money on the overall contract because we have it there and available.

R-22is roghly 13 per pound but it is supply and demand just like oil companies charge what you want there are several repalcements just have to change the oilto many a/c units out there to just quit making it

I work for a manufacturer of heating and air conditioning equipment and one of my duties is to purchase refrigerant for our tesing laboratory. Since we are an OEM, we are able to purchase refrigerant at wholesale costs. Currently, we are paying $3.44/pound for R410a and $9.25/pound for R-22. In our area, distributor prices for R-22 is anywhere from $11 to $13 per pound. Since refrigerant is considered a part, is is common for the field technician to charge twice what he paid for a pound of refrigerant. This is the same as your auto mechanic charging you $20 for a set of spark plugs he paid $10 for, and that's fair. But it is true that there is some serious price gouging going on in the HVAC business as far the cost per pound of refrigerant. We have some technicians who do field service on the side and they have been charging people up to $40 per pound which is a little more that 4 times what they paid for it from our Lab supply. Some of our techs even use our filtered reclaimed R-22 which they get for free. And people will pay sometimes anything to keep cool in 100° heat. The statement is incorrect that R-22 is no longer produced. I fact, it can be produced until the year 2020 for use in the service industry only. OEMs, however, have not been able to produce new R-22 systems since 2010. But the industry has found a loophole. Units made to operate on R-22 are being manufactured today without and refrigerant in them. They have a nitrogen charge only. These are used primarily for export to other countries who do not have a ban on R-22 or who refuse to use R-410a due to the higher operating pressures. But, I'm sure someone has found a way to legally sell uncharged R-22 systems in this country, although I'm not aware of it. But not to worry, because of higher operating pressures and the unpopularity in the foreign market, the industry is currently working on a new environmentally friendly refrigerant to replace R-410a. Back to the original issue, if you are being charged $30 to $175 per pound of R-22, let your service tech know is is charging too much or call your Better Business Bureau and file a complaint.

You have to question information presented along with "featured providers" a.k.a paid advertisers. Yes R22 is expensive for many reasons but that does not mean that you have to take it at face value when an HVAC Contractor tells you it is $100 per pound to replace because "the cost of R22 keeps increasing". Do your own homework. Shame on you Angie's List for not presenting unbiased information but instead presenting information which furthers the cause of your paid advertisers.

I remember R12, aka "freon", being replaced by the more " environmentally friendly" R-whatever ir was. A LICENSE was required to buy freon for servicing systems that used it; the new refrigerant could not be used in older freon based units and was less efficient. Now, the same scenario is playing out all over again, and I guarantee it won't be the last time. I also guarantee those ne'er do-wells in the EPA office s are feeling the refreshing breeze of the older R134A systems, and will until enough of our tax dollars are allocated to replace the HVAC systems with new units. This is scam perpetuated by people in power in the EPA who want to tax us for breathing, so this should come as a surprise to nobody.

I just read the article about the supply of R22 getting scarce and price ripoffs. I am including 2 website links about replacement refrigerant for all old ones, R12 also. The first site is the manufacture and explains all about the environmentally safe refrigerant replacements. The second site is where I have found the cheapest place to purchase them with free shipping. I have used the R22 replacement in my own system and it works great, much cheaper than replacing the entire system with a new one! Most of the HVAC contractors aren't aware of these products for some reason. If you show your contractor their availability he may be able to get them for use on your system or he may let you purchase them and install it for you. If you can do your own maintenance you can purchase them directly without having to have a license. MANUFACTURE WEBSITE: http://www.es-refrigerants.com/default.asp, CHEAPEST VENDOR WEBSITE (R22a 30lb cylinder $150) with free shipping: www.autorefrigerants.com . Good luck and I hope this saves you some money!

All though your information about replacements is very true it has some drawbacks. I am the owner of a HVAC company and I will just add a very important piece of information to your response. The replacement refrigerant for R-22 contains methane gas which is very flamable. If you have a system that is losing refrigerant the methane which is under lower pressure, does not tend to leak out as fast as the higher pressure chemicals that make up the replacement. As with all replacements, they are made up of a mixture of refrigerants and chemicals to obtain the same boil off temperatures as the gas you are trying to replace. Each time this leaks out you lose the higher pressure chemicals and leave some of the lower pressure chemicals. This changes the make up of the gas each time you add more refrigerant. leaving more methane as well as some of the other lower pressure chemicals each time, making for a refigerant that does not work as well and also is very flamable. Since we use torches to braze the lines together when replacing the unit or doing repairs, this could be a very dangerous. If you are using R-417A {mo-59} as a replacement, just make sure to read the saftey data sheet and understand you are reducing the efficiency of the AC as well as possibly creating a very dangerous situation for the guy who may work on it down the road who is not aware the system was altered. I hope this information is helpful to you as is only intended as information to be used by qualified technicians. On a side note - I agree that the price some contractors are charging is out of line. We charge $75 for the first pound and we reduce the price on a sliding scale depending on how much refrigerant the custmer needs all the way down to $25 per pound.

You are incorrect that new R-22 is no longer being produced. According to an article on the EPA website, "...chemical manufacturers will no longer be able to produce, and companies will no longer be able to import, R-22 for use in new A/C equipment after 2010, but they can continue production and import of R-22 until 2020 for use in servicing existing equipment." https://www.acca.org/archives/industry-resources/government-affairs/hot-air/6509 So there is no need for Kathy to use reclaimed R-22. Further, according to an article by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, as of August 2011, there was actually an oversupply of R-22: https://www.acca.org/archives/industry-resources/government-affairs/hot-air/6509 But because of this, the EPA is reducing allocations by up to 35%. Despite the recent oversupply, markets begin to react to future changes, now. So suppliers are likely anticipating lower supplies in the future by raising prices now. And by the way, a quick search suggests I can get 30 lb of R-22 for $425 right now. http://r22.org/prod_list.php?sci=3 That's $14 per lb. -- a far cry from $145 even marked up for a reasonable profit by a HVAC technician. Angie, are you working for your individual subscribers or for the contractors? Please give us more reliable info next time. Perhaps Kathy *IS* being scammed.

I recently priced R22 at a wholesale supplier and it was $12/lb. I asked my HVAC technician why he was charging $49.50/lb when I priced it at $12/lb; he cut his price in half. Best to get educated on this by calling a local HVAC parts supplier.

It's not just freon prices that have a huge markup. My parents AC system failed again and this time it was the start/run capacitor. The service charged $150.00 for the part itself. I found the exact same one for $35.00 at the local appliance parts distributor. I understand that a parts marup is important but almost 500%?

Jim you got a deal. I was charged $100 per lb not knowing any better. I agree that you should do your own homework and call around to compare prices. Unfortunately you can't even trust Angie's list as they profit from businesses who advertise in these so-called "expert" emails. Buyer beware!

This is just great!!--After upgrading my furnace and air conditioning only 7 short years ago to a new higher efficiency model, now I find out the coolant needed for the AC is on its way out, and in the meantime will be overly expensive should it be needed. So after 7 short years I will be forced to upgrade my AC once again to avoid paying exhorbitant coolant fees. These coolant prices are entirely out of line and unfair to those of us who have done a recent upgrade hoping to save some money--now, instead saving money with a more efficient system, all those savings will be eaten up servicing these relatively new systems. When the new coolant was introduced, why wasn't it made backwards compatible? Guess this is how the industry gets more profit forcing owners of relatively new systems to upgrade once again in short order!

ditto comments here, lots of brand new tanks priced $12-20/lb depending on size and shipping. but just heard watercooler talk that new stuff isnt that great and will probably be phased out next few years, i'll keep adding a lb every spring till our govt figures out how to make more in taxes on the next version of refrigerant. ya gotta love em...after all we cant shoot em.

Somebody might think this is true, but R-22 coolant is readily available in factory-sealed containers on Ebay for between $4 and $90 per pound. Bottom line, you're getting screwed. The technicians will tell you they charge that much because of "recovery and recycling costs," which is bullcrap if they are replacing coolant that already leaked out. http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=r-22+&_sacat=0&_odkw=r-22+coolant&_osacat=0

R-22 is still manufactured all over the world--except for the US. It was banned in the US because of a fear that the ozone layer in the atmosphere was at risk and that R-22 refrigerant was partially responsible. This has now been proven false, as R-22 is being dumped into the atmosphere by the ton in underdeveloped countries, yet the ozone layer has "miraculously" recovered. You don't hear much about the ozone layer anymore, do you? That is because it once again was nothing but a fear-based meme just as the global warming/climate change nonsense is being promulgated by the government as the crisis of the day. It also is nonsense.

R22 replaced CFC-11 & CFC-12 which were clearly harmful to the ozone layer. R22 is much less harmful to the ozone layer, but unfortunately has a very high global warming potential, more than 1800 times the effect of CO2. Most ozone-depleting chemicals have a very long persistence in the upper atmosphere, so even as global production of these compounds has decreased dramatically, we continue to see an Antarctic ozone hole at record or near-record levels, and will for some time into the future. The only reason that we don't hear about the ozone hole is that the media has moved on to the next issue, or the Kardashians. See http://www.theozonehole.com/

R-22 is still manufactured all over the world--except for the US. It was banned in the US because of a fear that the ozone layer in the atmosphere was at risk and that R-22 refrigerant was partially responsible. This has now been proven false, as R-22 is being dumped into the atmosphere by the ton in underdeveloped countries, yet the ozone layer has "miraculously" recovered. You don't hear much about the ozone layer anymore, do you? That is because it once again was nothing but a fear-based meme just as the global warming/climate change nonsense is being promulgated by the government as the crisis of the day. It also is nonsense.

In this article, "coolant" should be "refrigerant." "Coolant" is an incorrect term in this case. I recently had my old system recharged and paid $210 for 3.5 lbs of R22, and that was a good price. I am going to the system replaced with a new unit soon.

I appreciate the information you've provided. Thank you.

We just went through the same thing. You are exactly right Angie. We ended up replacing our AC unit which was 12 yrs old. MUCH BETTER!~

I have a c-store and have switched one of my coolers over to R-22a. It is a new refrigerant on the market as a replacement for R-22. Your serviceman will need to pump all of the R-22 out of your system so there is no contamination between the two different refrigerants. He will also need to know how many ounces of refrigerant your system holds. We have been running R-22a since February and have had no problems

actually r-134 is the correct replacement for r-12 but can be used for r-22 as well, r-410 and r-201 are for subzero cooling like walk in freezers

The problem with the R-22a is that it voids any type of warranty from the manufacturer. It does not allow the system to work at the same efficiency as the original refrigerant.

I have had issues with Puron since my air conditioner was installed. They replaced just about everything. But my most recent repairman had a thoughtful explanation. He said that I should NEVER need Puron replaced, that the service people don't know how to handle it. After five or six years, I didn't need it replaced for the first time. You should check into that.

There is no WAY in the world that ANY coolant, which is heavier than air can reach 30 plus miles into the atmosphere! This is another EPA scam in order to phase out manufacturing in the United States. If you simply want to fill your car with R134a, which replaced R-12 in the early 90's, you will have to pay 16 plus dollars for 4 ounces of the stuff, which isn't even harmful to the environment... THE EPA IS A BUNCH OF NUT CASES and it is costing us millions. Pool chlorine does more to "harm" the ozone layer than any of this other stuff EVER could!

Anybody have any ideas on how to find out when your A/C was manufactured and what type of coolant it uses? I think I can find my owner's manual but not everybody may have that option, especially if the A/C came with the house.

date of manufacture, refrigerant,and installation date should be on the manufacturers tag with serial number inside out door unit next to or no compressor and record of service tag should be attached to inlet fittings

The type of refrigerant is on the model tag on the unit. Unless your unit is under 5 years old it likely has r-22

Wholesale cost of r-22 is about $10/lb. there is no excuse for the charges claimed in this article. I had hoped that Angie's list would be more honest with consumers

R22 costs per pound verys do to when you bought it. You have to buy 30 lbs the price is over $500.00 per jug. A company must charge to enable them to buy more. My question is why are there leaks in your unit. Get them fixed if you dont want to pay.

Craig, I could not agree with you more. Seems to me Angie's list has accepted payment from HVAC contractors to submit this article as a marketing ploy. As a paid subscriber, I expect better from Angie's List.

Angie's List DISINFORMATION. SHAME ON YOU. Exactly. do a Google search for R22. It is sold in 30 lb containers. The size and type of your gas grill propane tanke. Price for 30 lbs is about 4-450 or so. Even if it is higher, there is absolutely no way anyone should be charged $175 for the first pound of charge. This is assuming that the $175 only represents the cost of the R22, and does not include the cost of service, travel, etc., etc. Considering that this article was headlined in an Angie's List emailing, your writer and your editor should be fired. We are paying for valid information to avoid being scammed. If this article represents the quality of your advice and research, I'll take my business elsewhere.

Yet another perfect example of the federal government encroaching upon our lives, impinging our freedoms, and making it hard for the middle class to succeed. They can't keep foreign invaders from crossing our borders, and yet they want to make U.S. citizens pay an arm and a leg for a product that MIGHT hurt the ozone layer, which MIGHT affect air quality, which MIGHT have a microscopic impact on the life of an ant in Asia. Obama: DEFEND OUR FREEDOMS--STOP TAKING THEM AWAY!

Ever since Vice President Al Gore began his holy war on air conditioners to prevent man caused global warming, 4 things have happened: 1. 9 out of 10 predictions have proven false with time. 2. In addition to refrigeration gasses costs, all cooling costs have increased, especially with the damage done to them by the original replacements. 3. NASA has confirmed via thousands of precise worldwide measurements taken from orbiting satellites and the space station that the temperature increase forecast has NOT taken place, and the earth bound readings used to claim so are due to faulty methodology. 4. The prime purpose was to reduce our "carbon footprint" or, in other words, the CO2 gas we produce. The replacement gasses for freon have resulted in 1200 times the production of CO2 as did freon gasses. And....... one more thing. Although all the various conversions and "reductions" have cost the public between 80 and 1000 billion dollars, minimum, Al Gore has made over 100 million dollars profit through his scare tactics while his own carbon footprint quadrupled.

Is it the production of R-22 that has stopped? Or is it the production of R-22 based cooling units? I wouldn't think that they would stop producing the coolant at the same time of the last production date of the cooling units.

Unfortunately the amount of R-22 produced and/or imported into the United States is under a moratorium. As of today the President has yet to sign the appropriate extension legislation allowing import and production of R-22 into the United States. That is the main reason the cost of R-22 is increasing the way it is. The production of R-22 systems was ceased in 2010.

Ever since Vice President Al Gore began his holy war on air conditioners to prevent man caused global warming, 4 things have happened: 1. 9 out of 10 predictions have proven false with time. 2. In addition to refrigeration gasses costs, all cooling costs have increased, especially with the damage done to them by the original replacements. 3. NASA has confirmed via thousands of precise worldwide measurements taken from orbiting satellites and the space station that the temperature increase forecast has NOT taken place, and the earth bound readings used to claim so are due to faulty methodology. 4. The prime purpose was to reduce our "carbon footprint" or, in other words, the CO2 gas we produce. The replacement gasses for freon have resulted in 1200 times the production of CO2 as did freon gasses. And....... one more thing. Although all the various conversions and "reductions" have cost the public between 80 and 1000 billion dollars, minimum, Al Gore has made over 100 million dollars profit through his scare tactics while his own carbon footprint quadrupled.

I know this feels right to you, but banning chlorinated hydrocarbon refrigerants had nothing to do with global warming or Al Gore. This process was put into place when the US signed onto the Montreal Protocol in 1987 during the presidency of Ronald Reagan. Chlorine containing refrigerants were phased out because they destroy the ozone layer. The ozone layer is quite important in blocking UV radiation.

Pages

Add comment

Anonymous reviews are Internet graffiti.  Angie's List has real reviews from real people.

What is Angie's List?

Angie’s List is the trusted site where more than 2 million households go to get ratings and reviews on everything from home repair to health care. Stop guessing when it comes to hiring! Check Angie’s List to find out who does the best work in town.

Local Discounts

Daily deals up to 70% off popular home improvement projects from top-rated contractors on Angie’s List!