Why Isn't My Car Heater Working?

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Hi, i worked in the automoble field for 8 years, I was the CIO of a large 8 location dealer group.


 Frankly, i would be leary of doing business with a company that is still pushing paint protectant or undercoating.  Undercoating is BIG no no as it will actually cause rust.  It traps water between the steel and the undercoating causing corrosion, it plugs up the door and rocker panel drains as well as drain holes in the uni-body frame rails.  The dealers cost for the undercoating is about 250.00 including man hours, it is a huge profit booster and nothing more.  Although Paint Protectant will cause no damage, it does no good.  It is nothing more than an acrylic polymer protectant which can be purchased at an automotive store...cost for the dealer including man hours, 75-100 dollars.  It is nothing more than a profit booster.


 Gap insurance is worth it, if you are involved in a collision and your car is a total loss, the insurance company generally pays you the trade value for the car.  Gap insurance will pay the difference between what the insurance pays you and how much you owe on the car.  for instance, if the insurance company pays you 2k dollars and you owe 3k, the gap insurance will pay the difference of 1k.  However, if you are finanacing 75 percent of the vehicle cost, then gap is not needed.


  Here is my best advice, pay for the car and not a single additional item.  Pay no more than 10 percent over cost, ask to see the dealer invoice, add 10 percent and pay that price.  Gap insurance can be purchased through the finance company after the purchase.


 So, if the invoice states the car cost the dealer 20k, you offer 22k and not a dime more as that is a fair profit for the dealer.  Puschase no other add ons, none.  If they wont show you the invoice, there are plenty of honest dealers that will.  I would be very careful with this dealer.


 Dealers also make money on financing.  for instance, they submit your loan for approval, the bank comes back and approves the loan at 6 percent interest.  The dealer will add 2 or 3 points charging 8-9 percent interest and the dealer gets the money for the points at the time of sale. Ask them how may points they are adding to the bank rate.


 I summary, be careful.  dont fall in love as there are many dealers with the same car.  Offer 10 percent over the dealer invoice and purchase nothing else.  if the dealer gets defensive, fails to show you the invoice, or pulls other sneaky tactics...WALK.  go to another dealer.


 I strongly recommend visiting visit www.edmonds.com to find the dealer cost for your car as well as many other informative car buying tips.




If it is the original timing belt, then yes - check your owners manual for the recommended changing frequency, but from a quick web search (not knowing your exact engine model) it looks like 60,000 recommended internal, and typically last 80-100,000 miles to failure if not changed.

The most frequent comment (and a red note items on manufacturer's website) is that you probably have a "zero-clearance" engine, an idiotic design that means if the valves are not fully closed when the piston come to the top, it hits the valves and breaks or bends them or punches a hole in the top of the piston. Talk about planned obsolescence !

In short, if that is the case and your belt breaks or gets so loose it strips the "teth" off it or slips, your valve timing will be off, and could cause catastrophic engine damage that would require a complete engine overhaul or replacement !

Unfortunately, after looking at a video on how to change the belt, they build it so almost all the auxiliary equipment has to be taken off to change the belt - the alternator, water pump, radiator upper hose, power steering pump, air conditioner, etc - so rough cost is $800-1200 ! If you are getting it changed, it is also recommended to replace the water pump while it is off.

Hopefully some Montero mechanic will hop on this question and expand on this, but NO engine belt of any type should be trusted to go 115K miles.

A great deal depends on the use of the vehicle.  If you do a lot of mountain driving or heave towing, then a flush would be necessary.  Under normal driving conditions, a flush is NOT necessary at 46K miles.  The shops make money on flushes, that's why they recommend them.  Most transmissions are good for 100,000 miles before requiring maintenance.  Your owners manual should say.....if not then leave it alone.  Maintenance is debated between a flush and a fluid drain and fill.  Both have merits and down sides.  Alternative Car Care is not a fan of flushes and will not do them.  We would rather drain the fluid and change the filter.

Power steering is an ofter overlooked service component on the car.


Around these parts, $150 - $200 gets you a BG flush and fill.